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Articles on Disease transmission

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Avian cholera is a highly contagious disease that has produced rapid population loss in Northern common eiders. (Shutterstock)

How Arctic sea ducks develop herd immunity from avian cholera

We can learn about the spread of diseases through populations by studying naturally occurring instances of herd immunity. Avian cholera in the Canadian Arctic provides a useful case study.
We’ve learned much more about the novel coronavirus over the last few months, including that most spreading events occur inddoors. (Shutterstock)

How to prevent COVID-19 ‘superspreader’ events indoors this winter

As the coronavirus pandemic continues, and the colder weather approaches, new mathematical models are needed to study changing social behaviours and indoor spaces.
David Crosling/AAP Image

A $200 fine for not wearing a mask is fair, as long as free masks go to those in need

The fines for failing to wear a mask during Melbourne’s lockdown have been criticised as ‘punitive’. But the fact that masks are cheap or free, with huge public health benefits, makes it justifiable.
A restaurant in Bangkok created plastic partitions and moved its tables farther apart to separate guests in a normally tight space. Lillian Suwanrumpha/AFP/Getty Images

How to lower your coronavirus risk while eating out: Restaurant advice from an infectious disease expert

It’s hard to eat while wearing a face mask, and social distancing isn’t easy in restaurants’ normally tight quarters. An infectious disease expert offers some tips on what to look for to stay safe.
People shop at the reopening of the Farmer’s Market in Manhattan Beach, California on May 12, 2020. Jay L. Clendenin/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

How do you stay safe now that states are reopening? An expert explains how to assess risk when reconnecting with friends and family

The US is slowly reopening, but the messages from governments are confusing. An expert offers guidance on many people’s first priority – connecting with loved ones.

Citizen science: how you can contribute to coronavirus research without leaving the house

As scientists frantically try to find drugs to slow COVID-19’s spread, citizen science offers an opportunity for all of us to get involved.
Places where lots of animals come into contact can help pathogens move from species to species. Baloncici/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Re-creating live-animal markets in the lab lets researchers see how pathogens like coronavirus jump species

In the real world, new diseases emerge from complex environments. To learn more about how, scientists set up whole artificial ecosystems in the lab, instead of focusing on just one factor at a time.
Camp beds set up for travelers returning to Germany from China, who will be isolated for two weeks to make sure they don’t have coronavirus. YANN SCHREIBER/AFP via Getty Images

Quarantines have tried to keep out disease for thousands of years

Even before people understood how germs spread disease, they tried to isolate the sick to keep them from infecting others.
Recent improvements in medical management of HIV infection are not well understood in the legal sector. www.shutterstock.com

Australian law needs a refresher on the science of HIV transmission

HIV diagnosis is devastating for patients and their families. But the infection is no longer a death sentence, and should not be prosecuted as such say experts.

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