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Articles on Junk food

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Research reveals links between the irritability, explosive rage and unstable moods that have grown more common in recent years, and a lack of micronutrients that are important for brain function. (Shutterstock)

Junk food and the brain: How modern diets lacking in micronutrients may contribute to angry rhetoric

Ultra-processed foods high in sugar, fat and empty carbs are bad for the mind as well as the body. Lack of micronutrients affects brain function and influences mood and mental health symptoms.
Shutterstock

Appetite for convenience: how the surge in online food delivery could be harming our health

During the pandemic, Australians have been using food delivery apps more than ever. We’ve assessed how healthy the options available to us are — and the news isn’t good.
The teenage brain has a voracious drive for reward, diminished behavioural control and a susceptibility to be shaped by experience. This often manifests as a reduced ability to resist high-calorie junk foods. (Shutterstock)

How junk food shapes the developing teenage brain

Excessively eating junk foods during adolescence could alter brain development, leading to lasting poor diet habits. But, like a muscle, the brain can be exercised to improve willpower.
Bill Maher suggests that fat-shaming may help people lose weight. Randy Miramontez/Shutterstock.com

Why Bill Maher is wrong about fat-shaming

Fat-shaming is as ineffective as it is cruel. The bullying tactic also ignores the biological factors underlying obesity, which are not always under a person’s control.
One of the lesser-known effects of a poor diet: blindness. Tracy Spohn/Shutterstock

Poor diet can lead to blindness

Most people know that a poor diet can lead to heart disease, diabetes and even cancer. Few are aware that it can also cause blindness.
Supermarkets may discount junk foods to capitalise on the ‘impulse buy’. From shutterstock.com

Supermarkets put junk food on special twice as often as healthy food, and that’s a problem

Our new study finds in Australian supermarkets, the lower the health star rating, the higher the discounts. The time is ripe for a national conversation about making discounts healthier.

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