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Articles on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

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A worker in Wuhan, China removes biomedical waste from the Wuhan Medical Treatment Center, where many patients of the coronavirus have been treated, on Jan. 22, 2020. AP Photo/Dake Kang

Are you in danger of catching the coronavirus? 5 questions answered

The coronavirus that has sickened hundreds in Wuhan, China, has worried health officials and other humans across the globe. Should people in the US worry?
Health authorities are worried because they don’t know how dangerous this strain of coronavirus could be. Facundo Arrizaba BALAGA

Should we be worried about the new Wuhan coronavirus?

The virus seems to spread like any other respiratory illness – through coughs and sneezes, or contact with contaminated surfaces. Here's what we know about it so far.
Bats are the only mammals capable of true flight. Scientists believe flight may influence their immune responses to coronoviruses, which cause fatal diseases such as SARS and MERS in humans. (Shutterstock)

Can bats help humans survive the next pandemic?

Scientific studies show that bats may carry "coronoviruses" causing SARS and MERS - without showing symptoms of disease. Could the bat immune system be key to human survival in future pandemics?
A virus like SARS can shut down cytokine production, enabling it to multiply to higher levels and causing significant infection and even death. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kevin Frayer)

Explainer: How the human body first fights off pathogens

We've all endured infections. Here's how it works when our bodies are attacked by viruses, bacteria or parasites, and our innate immune system becomes the first line of defence.
Children in particular experience a multitude of viral illnesses during their early years. MIKI Yoshihito/Flickr

Health Check: when are we most likely to catch viral diseases?

Viruses cause all kinds of infections from relatively mild cases of the flu to deadly outbreaks of Ebola. Clearly, not all viruses are equal and one of these differences is when you can infect others.
Avoiding contact with people who have respiratory infections – and are coughing or sneezing – is the key to protection. Jina K/Shutterstock

Explainer: what is the MERS outbreak in South Korea?

Twelve years ago the world was threatened by an outbreak of a new coronavirus called SARS. MERS belongs to the same virus family and has killed 19 people in South Korea.
It’s unclear whether Spanish dog Excalibur, pictured here with owner Javier Limon (husband of Ebola-infected nurse Teresa Ramos), was infected. EFE/PACMA

We still don’t know if domestic animals can spread Ebola

Spanish authorities have euthanised the dog of Madrid nurse Teresa Romero Ramos, who contracted Ebola. The 12-year-old dog, Excalibur, was not showing symptoms and was not tested for Ebola. But he lived…
When you hear hooves, shout camel, not bioterrorist. Delpixel/Flickr

Middle East respiratory virus came from camels, not terrorists

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a tiny, spiky package of fat, proteins and genes that was first found in a dying man in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in 2012. Since then, we…
Many people infected have had no contact with camels or other animals. Al Jazeera English/Flickr

MERS coronavirus: animal source or deliberate release?

The Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS Co-V) emerged in 2012 and has caused ongoing illness in the Middle East and more than 280 deaths. The public health response to MERS-CoV has been…
Coronaviruses are the cause of both the 2003 SARS and the recent MERS outbreaks. Eneas/Flickr

Scientists find killer chemical for virus behind SARS and MERS

A team of European researchers has identified a novel compound that stops coronaviruses from replicating. The study, published in PLOS Pathogens today, also pinpoints the juncture in the virus’ life cycle…
He’s got the hump. PA/Ben Birchall

Camels likely suspects behind MERS, but mysteries remain

The discovery that dromedary camels may be a key source of the virus behind Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) looks to unravel one of the biggest mysteries surrounding outbreaks of the deadly…

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