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Articles on Nazi Germany

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A trainload of expelled ethnic Germans from Czechoslovakia arrives in Bavaria, Germany, after World War II. dpa/picture alliance via Getty Images

Postwar forced resettlement of Germans echoes through the decades

After World War II ended in Europe, millions of ethnic Germans faced an uncertain future. The political repercussions of their expulsion continue even today.
President Donald Trump congratulates newly naturalized citizens via a recorded message at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Miami field office. AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee

Supreme Court allows public charge clause that kept Nazi-era refugees from the US

During the Nazi era, roughly 300,000 additional Jewish refugees could have gained entry to the US. But the immigration law’s 'likely to become a public charge' clause kept them out.
Chinese paramilitary police stand duty in People’s Square where hundreds of Uighers first started a protest that erupted into rioting in July 2009. Five years later, China started imprisoning Uighers in “re-education hospitals.” (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

The ominous metaphors of China’s Uighur concentration camps

The metaphors used to defend the 21st century’s largest system of concentration camps are chillingly similar to Nazi Holocaust-era justifications.
A looted Jewish shop in Aachen, Germany on the day after Kristallnacht, Nov. 10, 1938. Wolf Gruner and Armin Nolzen (eds.). 'Bürokratien: Initiative und Effizienz,' Berlin, 2001.

The forgotten mass destruction of Jewish homes during ‘Kristallnacht’

Most histories highlight the shattered storefronts and synagogues set aflame. But it was the systematic ransacking of Jewish homes that extracted the greatest toll.
“Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet. And who will not become a public charge,” said Acting head of Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli. AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Trump administration revives public charge clause that kept Nazi-era refugees from the US

During the Nazi era, roughly 300,000 additional Jewish refugees could have gained entry to the U.S. But the immigration law’s “likely to become a public charge” clause kept them out.
Graffiti probably Banksy, denouncing the conditions in which prisoners have been detained in Guantanamo. Photo Eadmundo

The lesson of ‘The White Ribbon’ for today: How tolerant societies can drift into hatred

Michael Haneke's allegorical 2009 film showed how a peaceful society can be shattered within a single generation. It's a lesson for us now in a world drifting toward populism and violence.

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