Menu Close

Articles on Vocational education and training

Displaying 1 - 20 of 77 articles

Shutterstock

Most young people who do VET after school are in full-time work by the age of 25

There are five transitions young people aged 16-25 make between school and employment. Most involve some vocational education and training. Some involve university and others no education at all.
The disastrous experience of vocational education and training in Australia holds many lessons about trying to fit education into a for-profit market model. www.shutterstock.com

Why the profit motive fails in education

Market forces don't work well in education. For-profit businesses are more tempted to exploit loopholes than provide quality service.
Students in the electrical program at H.C. Wilcox Technical High School in Meriden, Connecticut practice their skills. Connecticut Technical Education and Career System

For male students, technical education in high school boosts earnings after graduation

Students who get admitted to Connecticut's career and technical education high schools are more likely to graduate and earn significantly more than peers who barely missed the cut.
Once qualified, men who did a popular engineering-related VET course often worked in high-paid fields such as construction or manufacturing. from shutterstock.com

If you have a low ATAR, you could earn more doing a VET course than a uni degree – if you’re a man

Students with lower ATARs generally have lower lifetime earnings. But a Grattan Institute report found low ATAR men could earn more doing a VET course than a bachelor degree in their chosen field.
Most Indigenous art works are produced in around 90 Indigenous art centres located in very remote regions of Australia. CameliaTWU/Flickr

Indigenous art centres that sustain remote communities are at risk. The VET sector can help

Most Indigenous art works are produced in around 90 Indigenous art centres located in very remote regions. But there are staff and management issues, which can be solved by better VET programs.
We’re entering the fourth industrial revolution, which isn’t a bad thing. But it does mean we need to take action. from shutterstock.com

Jobs are changing, and fast. Here’s what the VET sector (and employers) need to do to keep up

Training providers and employers aren't adapting fast enough to meet the skill needs thrown up by the fourth industrial revolution.
When professionals, like pharmacists, are able to communicate in many languages, everyone benefits. AS Photo Studio/Shutterstock

How South Africa’s universities are making more students multilingual

Vocation specific language courses can encourage both linguistic and cultural awareness. They can equip students with the basics they need to communicate.

Top contributors

More