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Artículos sobre Black History Month

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In this Feb. 2, 1964, image, Bayard Rustin talks on a telephone from a church in Brooklyn, New York. Patrick A. Burns/New York Times Co./Getty Images

Meet Bayard Rustin, often-forgotten civil rights activist, gay rights advocate, union organizer, pacifist and man of compassion for all in trouble

Bayard Rustin led a long and complicated life dedicated to the fight for equal rights. Targeted by the FBI, Rustin became a close adviser to Martin Luther King Jr.
‘Racism kills, here, there and in the whole world,’ reads a sign in Mexico City, at the U.S. Embassy in May 2020, following protests after George Floyd’s murder. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

In Mexico, how erasing Black history fuels anti-Black racism

Nationalist myth has associated ‘true Mexicanness’ with being ‘meztizo’ — a racial and cultural mix of Indigenous and Spaniard, even while the state enacted policies to assimilate Indigenous Peoples.
In 1941, Robeson recorded an album of Chinese fighting and folk songs with activist Liu Liangmo with the Chinese People’s Chorus — organized among members of the Chinese Hand Laundry Alliance in New York City’s Chinatown. (Gordon Parks for the U.S. Farm Security Administration/Office of War Information/Wikimedia/Keynote records)

How American singer, actor and civil rights activist Paul Robeson became a hero in China

In China, Robeson continues to be remembered as a loyal friend celebrated for popularizing what became China’s national anthem and building solidarity between peoples of China and African Americans.
Almost 30 per cent of Black households and 50 per cent of Indigenous households experience food insecurity. Bart Heird/Unsplash

Making our food fairer: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 12

Our food systems are failing to feed all of us. In this episode of Don’t Call Me Resilient, we pick apart what is broken and ways to fix it with two women who battle food injustice.
The work of imagining alternate futures is also about re-casting alternative pasts, as is done in the award-winning novel, ‘Washington Black’ by Esi Edugyan and adapted for the screen by podcast guest Selwyn Seyfu Hinds. Washington Black/Random House

How stories about alternate worlds can help us imagine a better future: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 7

Stories about alternative worlds can be a powerful way of critiquing the problems of our own world.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

When COVID-19 first appeared, some called it the great equalizer. But the facts quickly revealed a grim reality: COVID-19 disproportionately impacts racialized communities.
An early 20th-century NAACP map showing lynchings between 1909 and 1918. The maps were sent to politicians and newspapers in an effort to spur legislation protecting Black Americans. Library of Congress

How Black cartographers put racism on the map of America

Mapping is one way African Americans fight for equality and help each other navigate a racially hostile landscape.

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