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‘The Queens Closet Opened,’ first published in 1655, shared recipes and support for the deposed monarchy. Here, portrait of Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria, by Anthony van Dyck, 1632. (Arcidiecézní muzeum Kroměříž/Wikimedia)

Cooking in the coronavirus crisis is much more fun with old secrets from the Queen’s pantry

Recipe sharing is all the rage in the pandemic as in other times of turmoil. English cookbooks of the 16th and 17th centuries promised recipes for comfort with a dash of glamour.
Leftovers, as one French chef put it, ‘can be as good as, if not better than, the first time they are served.’ Tom Grundy/Shutterstock.com

What to do with those Thanksgiving leftovers? Look to the French

It doesn't have to be a week of tiresome turkey sandwiches. A food historian explains how the French came to see leftovers as an outlet for creativity and experimentation.
In a recent research study, around 10 per cent of the recipes examined contained unsafe food preparation instructions. (Shutterstock)

How to safely handle food and avoid salmonella

A food safety expert offers six tips on safe food handling that many cookbooks and cooking shows fail to deliver.
Reading recipes enhances vocabulary. Baking involves measurement, addition and subtraction. Slicing your personal pizza is a great way to explain fractions to your child. (Shutterstock)

The gift of cooking: Five fun and healthy recipe books for kids

Research shows that cooking with your kids helps them try more foods, eat more healthily and waste less food. It also offers opportunities to practise math and bond as a family.

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