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Artículos sobre Facial recognition

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Beginning this summer, you might need to upload a selfie and a photo ID to a private company, ID.me, if you want to file your taxes online. Oscar Wong/Moment via Getty Images

Government agencies are tapping a facial recognition company to prove you’re you – here’s why that raises concerns about privacy, accuracy and fairness

Federal and state governments are turning to a facial recognition company to ensure that people accessing services are who they say they are. The move promises to cut down on fraud, but at what cost?
A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
Government agencies are increasingly using facial recognition technology, including through security cameras like this one being installed on the Lincoln Memorial in 2019. Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Feds are increasing use of facial recognition systems – despite calls for a moratorium

Politicians of all stripes, computer professionals and even big-tech executives are calling on government to hit the brakes on using these algorithms. The feds are hitting the gas.
A U.S. Army soldier scans the irises of an Afghan civilian in 2012 as part of an effort by the military to collect biometric information from much of the Afghan population. Jose Cabezas/AFP via GettyImages

The Taliban reportedly have control of US biometric devices – a lesson in life-and-death consequences of data privacy

The potential failure of the U.S. military to protect information that can identify Afghan citizens raises questions about whether and how biometric data should be collected in war zones.
Vaccine passports may soon be required for travelling amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Like biometrics, they’ll likely become a permanent part of our daily lives — and there’s barely been any debate about them. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Why we need to seriously reconsider COVID-19 vaccination passports

COVID-19 vaccine passports are being presented as a relatively simple technological solution to our current travel woes. But meaningful public debate about their merits and problems is essential.

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