Artículos sobre Flooding

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Maine’s Penobscot River flows freely where the Veazie Dam once stood. Dam removals have reopened the river to 12 native fish species. Gregory Rec/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

When dams cause more problems than they solve, removing them can pay off for people and nature

Thousands of dams across the US are aging and overdue for maintenance. Taking them down can revive rivers, restore fish runs and create new opportunities for tourism and outdoor activities.
When deadly tornadoes struck the Southeast in April, residents in Prentiss, Mississippi, struggled to keep up coronavirus precautions while salvaging what they could from their damaged properties. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis

Can your community handle a natural disaster and coronavirus at the same time?

If the forecasts are right, the US could be facing more natural disasters this year – on top of the coronavirus pandemic. Local governments aren't prepared.
On November 12, 2019, in Venise, the sea rose 1.87 metres above its normal level, flooding much of the city. Ihor Serdyukov/Shutterstock

Notre-Dame and Venice: why such a gap in generosity?

More than 1 billion euros were donated after Paris’ cathedral was grievously damaged by fire in April. By comparison, just a few million euros were given after catastrophic flooding in Cité des Doges.
Rescue workers sift through debris after a mudslide that destroyed three homes on a hillside in Sausalito, Calif., Feb. 14, 2019, during an atmospheric river storm. AP Photo/Michael Short

Atmospheric river storms can drive costly flooding – and climate change is making them stronger

Earth's biggest rivers are streams of warm water vapor in the atmosphere that can cause huge rain and snowfall over land. Climate change is making them longer, wetter and stronger.

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