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Artículos sobre Indigenous

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Former Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc Chief Shane Gottfriedson, left, speaks as hiwus (Chief) Warren Paull, of the shíshálh Nation, listens during a news conference, in Vancouver, on Jan. 21, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Canada’s $2.8 billion settlement with Indigenous Day Scholars is a long time coming

This new agreement finally allows First Nations to decide for themselves how the funding will revitalize their language and culture independently of the government.
A rare photo from an Indian Residential School in Fort Resolution, N.W.T. These systems have been labeled a form of genocide by the Canadian House of Commons. (Department of Mines and Technical Surveys/Library and Archives Canada)

Residential school system recognized as genocide in Canada’s House of Commons: A harbinger of change

Canada’s recent resolution to label the Indian Residential School system as genocide (and not cultural genocide) is not a mere alteration of words, it is a significant and consequential change.
Protesters interrupt a speech by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau — demanding that the government stop invading Indigenous land — during the opening ceremony of COP15, the UN conference on biodiversity, in Montréal, on Dec. 6, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

Indigenous conservation funding must reflect Canada’s true debt to First Nations, Inuit and Métis

In order to meet its 2030 biodiversity targets, Canada is heavily relying on Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas, which could do more harm than good for First Nations, Inuit and Métis.
The Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity adopted their new post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework on Dec.19, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

COP15’s Global Biodiversity Framework must advance Indigenous-led conservation to halt biodiversity loss by 2030

As protected and conserved areas increase, an equity-based approach that respects Indigenous rights can help bring the transformative changes we need to halt and reverse biodiversity loss.
An orangutan and a human share a moment and touch hands. Indigenous philosophies regard animals as human’s close relations deserving of respect, kindness and gratitude from birth to the end of their lives. (Shutterstock)

How Indigenous philosophies can improve the way Canadians treat animals

Indigenous views and ways of knowing should be applied to the way we keep, use, and kill animals, and in how we teach future generations about animal use and their care.
The Fulford Harbour sea garden clam bed was built by First Nations in the Salish Sea near Salt Spring Island, B.C. Despite growing recognition that lands managed by Indigenous Peoples are, on average, more biodiverse, biodiversity conservation has typically marginalized Indigenous Peoples. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

COP15 biodiversity summit in Montréal: Canada failed to meet its 2020 conservation targets. Will 2030 be any better?

As we set conservation goals for the next decade, we need to evaluate what worked and what didn’t in our efforts to meet the 2020 biodiversity conservation targets.
A sign on Charlotte St., in Sackville, N.B. Women rarely come from places named after women, and the exceptions usually commemorate them differently than men. (Peter Barr)

Women are vastly underrepresented in Canada’s place names

Far more streets, buildings and public spaces in Canada are named after men than women, despite women making up a majority of the population.
Duncan McCue, left, walks with Rocky James, a podcast guest on CBC’s ‘Kuper Island.’ (Evan Aagaard/CBC Podcasts)

How to decolonize journalism — Podcast

Canadian journalist institutions have failed to address their ongoing colonialism and that has meant that urgent Indigenous issues have been ignored or sensationalized.
University research has a legacy of doing harm to Indigenous communities. However, a new collaborative project is showing how research can be done in a better and inclusive way. (Shutterstock)

Collaborative Indigenous Research is a way to repair the legacy of harmful research practices

Harmful research practices have done serious damage to Indigenous communities and created distrust. The Collaborative Indigenous Research Digital Garden is one way to repair that damage.
Neighbours from Tla’amin, K’omoks, Qualicum and Tsimshian Nations gather around the newly. erected plaque on Xwe’etay honoring the ancestral Indigenous people of the island. (Kathy Schulz)

How community-engaged archaeology can be a pathway to reconciliation

One project on a small island in B.C. is demonstrating how archaeology can bring communities together and serve as a basis for reconciliation.
Co-author of this article, Chief Ninawa, hereditary Chief of the Huni Kui Indigenous people of the Amazon, holds a sign that says: ‘Amazon is life, petroleum and gas is death’ outside a hotel in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

Views from COP27: How the climate conference could confront colonialism by centring Indigenous rights

A different future will not be possible without reverence, respect, reciprocity and responsibility towards the Earth. On this issue, Indigenous Peoples have a lot to share.

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