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Artículos sobre Mass surveillance

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State surveillance has a big impact on the way RCMP treat Indigenous land defenders. Listen to our podcast for more info. Here, RCMP officers walk toward an anti-logging blockade in Caycuse, B.C., in May. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jen Osborne

Intense police surveillance for Indigenous land defenders contrasts with a laissez-faire stance for anti-vax protesters

In recent years, Indigenous land defenders have lived under increasing police and state surveillance while far-right, conspiratorial movements have not.
A CCTV camera sculpture in Toronto draws attention to the increasing surveillance in everyday life. Our guests discuss ways to resist this creeping culture. Lianhao Qu /Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10

Mass data collection and surveillance have become ubiquitous. For marginalized communities, the stakes of having their privacy violated are high.
A photo of art work by Banksy in London comments on the power imbalance of surveillance technology. Guests on this episode discuss how AI and Facial recognition have been flagged by civil rights leaders due to its inherent racial bias. Niv Singer/Unsplash

Being Watched: How surveillance amplifies racist policing and threatens the right to protest — Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 10 transcript

Once analysts gain access to our private data, they can use that information to influence and alter our behaviour and choices. If you’re marginalized in some way, the consequences are worse.
On October 22, the French junior minister for digital transition and electronic communication, Cedric O, and the French prime minister, Jean Castex (rear) announcing the changeover of several departments to ‘maximum alert’, new curfew measures, and the new app ‘Tous Anti Covid’. Ludovic Marin/AFP

Digital privacy and Covid-19: between a paradox and a hard place

In the current pandemic, finding the right balance between the protection of public health and respecting civil liberties has proven to be supremely difficult.
Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. Some politicians are concerned Ring’s video-sharing partnerships with police departments encroach on people’s privacy and civil liberties. THE ASSOCIATED PRESS/Jessica Hill

One Ring to rule them all: Surveillance ‘smart’ tech won’t make Canadian cities safer

Amazon says it’s the “new neighbourhood watch” but Ring may just be another technology that gives police too much data and lets neighbourhoods double down on their biases.
The Northern Territory government is expanding the CCTV surveillance network. Dan Himbrechts/AAP

Is China’s social credit system coming to Australia?

Darwin is one of the aspiring ‘smart cities’ that is adopting Chinese technology that can identify and track individuals. Add changes in Australian law, and we have the makings of a surveillance state.
Cairns has an extensive CCTV network, which as well as keeping homeless people under surveillance is sometimes used to help them. Andreina Schoeberlein/Flickr

Turning ‘big brother’ surveillance into a helping hand to the homeless

Surveillance often results in people who are homeless being the target of enforcement measures. But a new study in Cairns shows surveillance can also be used to achieve more positive social outcomes.
Who’s collecting your data, and what are they using your data for? Brian A. Jackson/Shutterstock.com

The real costs of cheap surveillance

What governments and companies think they know about us – whether or not it’s accurate – has real power over our actual lives.

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