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Artículos sobre US Senate

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The Senate wing of the U.S. Capitol building. Matt H. Wade via Wikimedia Commons

What happens when senators die or are incapacitated?

With several senators testing positive for the coronavirus, and many older than 65, political scientists look at 1954, when senators' deaths changed control of the chamber.
Reasonable precautions like advising customers to wear masks can be enough to prevent successful lawsuits. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

Business liability shield is holding up another coronavirus bailout – a legal scholar explains why immunity is unnecessary and even harmful

Senate Republicans continue to push for sweeping liability protection for companies from coronavirus-related lawsuits, but research and evidence suggests there's little real risk.
Most states struggle to meet pension funding needs – and the pandemic will make it worse. hudiemm/Getty

COVID-19 will turn the state pension problem into a fiscal crisis

Many of the public employee pension plans run by states don't have enough money in them to make upcoming pension payments to retired state workers. The pandemic could make that problem much worse.
Together no more: remote voting for Congress could be the outcome of public health restrictions on gatherings. House of Representatives

Coronavirus restrictions likely to lead to remote voting for Congress

Democrats may soon propose letting members of Congress vote by proxy during the pandemic. A legal scholar says the language the Founders used 233 years ago could allow voting remotely.
Thousands of Armenian-Americans gather to commemorate the 103rd anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Los Angeles, California on April 24, 2018. Ronen Tivony/Nur via Getty Images

Armenian genocide: US recognition of Turkey’s killing of 1.5 million was tangled up in decades of geopolitics

As Armenian Genocide Remembrance Day is marked around the globe, a historian examines the little-known players in the long-running fight in the US Congress to pass a bill acknowledging the Genocide.
Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase presided over the Senate during President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial. Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper/Wikimedia Commons

The Senate has actually tied in an impeachment trial – twice

In 1868, during the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson, the Senate tied on two votes. Chief Justice Salmon P. Chase broke both ties.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., during debate over rules for the Senate impeachment trial against President Donald Trump, Jan. 21, 2020. Senate Television via AP

Precedent? Nah, the Senate gets to reinvent its rules in every impeachment

Certain words are being used over and over during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. One of them is 'precedent.' What does it really mean?

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