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Articles sur Australian history

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Universities Australia chair Deborah Terry’s job description includes openly lobbying government, an approach that has its origins in the sector’s post-war financial crisis. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Universities in crisis? They’ve been there before, and found a way out

A post-war funding crisis forced universities to take the initiative in making their case to the public. A new history explores how universities did it and the changes they brought about.
This sketch depicts the Waterloo Creek massacre (also known as the Slaughterhouse Creek massacre), part of the conflict between mounted police and Indigenous Australians in 1838. Godfrey Charles Mundy/National Library of Australia

Enforcing assimilation, dismantling Aboriginal families: a history of police violence in Australia

Police played a unique role in many settler colonies executing assimilationist policies designed to dismantle First Nations families.
Johnstone Shire Hall was the birthplace of an ambitious partnership between 11 local governments in 1944. Together, they led a regional post-war reconstruction agenda in North Queensland. State Library of Queensland

Lessons from history point to local councils’ role in Australia’s recovery

In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, regional Australia needs local government to emulate the example of the local councils that brought prosperity to North Queensland after the second world war.
DAVID CROSLING/AAP

250 years since Captain Cook landed in Australia, it’s time to acknowledge the violence of first encounters

250 years since Captain Cook landed in Australia, it’s time to acknowledge the violence of first encounters. The Conversation, CC BY63 Mo (download)
The way Australia has commemorated Cook's arrival has changed over time – from military displays in 1870 to waning interest in Cook in the 1950s, followed by the fever pitch celebrations of 1970.
Uncle Fred Deeral as little old man in the film The Message, by Zakpage, to be shown at the National Museum of Australia in April. Nik Lachajczak of Zakpage

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start

An honest reckoning with Captain Cook’s legacy won’t heal things overnight. But it’s a start. The Conversation41,4 Mo (download)
The impact of 1770 has never eased for Aboriginal people. It was a collision of catastrophic proportions.

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