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Articles sur Election integrity

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President Vladimir Putin addresses his United Russia party at its June 2021 convention, where members convened to choose candidates and draft a strategy for the country’s upcoming election. Grigory Sysoyev\TASS via Getty Images

Vladimir Putin plans to win Russia’s parliamentary election no matter how unpopular his party is

Despite a 27% approval rating, Putin’s United Russia party can maintain its legislative majority in September through manipulation and fraud, says an expert on Russian elections.
The Supreme Court waited until the final day of its 2020-2021 term, July 1, 2021, to issue two controversial decisions, including one that may dramatically limit voting rights in the US. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Supreme Court blunts voting rights in Arizona – and potentially nationwide – in controversial ruling

The court upheld two Arizona laws that limit when, where and how people can vote.The ruling further guts the Voting Rights Act at a time when many US states are passing more restrictive voting rules.
The Maricopa County Election Department counts ballots in Phoenix on Nov. 5, 2020. Arizona’s election laws are the subject of a pending Supreme Court decision. Olivier Touron/AFP via Getty Images

Supreme Court weighs voting rights in a pivotal Arizona case

In Brnovich v. DNC, the court will decide whether two Arizona rules unfairly hurt poor, minority and rural voters. The ruling could determine the fate of many states’ restrictive new voting laws.
Until this year, people who wanted to live here had to win not just more votes than their opponents, but more state legislative districts too. Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Mississippi just got rid of its Electoral College-like election process

Since 1890, Mississippi has required candidates for statewide office to win not only more votes than opponents across the whole state, but also in every legislative district.
Election officials counting ballots at the Allegheny County elections warehouse Friday in Pittsburgh. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

How votes are counted in Pennsylvania: Changing numbers are a sign of transparency, not fraud, during an ongoing process

As vote counts tick upward, people may have questions about why one candidate does better with mail-in votes or in-person ballots. Here are the answers, and an explanation of how the counting happens.
Poll workers, election observers and poll monitors are all on hand at voting places to ensure the 2020 election proceeds smoothly and safely. Macrovector/iStock via GettyImages

You have rights when you go to vote – and many people are there to help if there’s trouble at the polls

An army of volunteers is working at the polls and behind the scenes to ensure election 2020 runs smoothly and safely. Here’s whom to turn to if things go wrong.
What happens when an election is contested? Gorilla Studio/Getty

A contested election: 6 essential reads

The presidential election outcome seems to be at least partially in dispute. Six scholars provide a history of contested elections in the US and explain what happens when the results are challenged.
A King County, Washington election worker verifies signatures accompanying ballots cast in the state’s August primary. AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Timing, signatures and huge demand make mail-in voting difficult

It’s not just whether the US Postal Service can handle the load. In 2020 primaries, states have had trouble distributing, collecting and counting mailed-in ballots.
Election workers are part of the protections ensuring that mail-in ballots aren’t fraudulent. Will Cioci/Wisconsin Watch via AP

6 ways mail-in ballots are protected from fraud

The mail-in voting process has several built-in safeguards that make it hard for one person to vote fraudulently, and even more difficult to commit large-scale voter fraud.
With rare exceptions, like the 2000 presidential election, the winning candidate usually declares victory on election night. But the win isn’t actually certified until January. ranklin McMahon/CORBIS/Corbis via Getty Images

Who formally declares the winner of the US presidential election?

No, it’s not the TV news networks. The American election certification process is a lot more complicated than that.
Wisconsin voters had to wait in line in April, wearing masks, because they could not vote by mail. Kamil Krzaczynski/AFP via Getty Images

Some states more ready for mail-in voting than others

In many states, any voter can ask for an absentee ballot and mail it in – but in others, there are stricter rules about who can vote by mail.
Elements of smart homes, including thermostats, may be vulnerable to hackers. Ann Hermes/The Christian Science Monitor via Getty Images

‘Internet of things’ could be an unseen threat to elections

Co-opting internet-connected devices could disrupt transportation systems on Election Day, stymie political campaigns, or help make information warfare more credible.
The 2019 European Parliament elections were well defended against outside interference. AP Photo/Olivier Matthys

European elections suggest US shouldn’t be complacent in 2020

Though the effects were less this time, voters across the globe should remain vigilant against disinformation campaigns and election system hacking.
As Americans go to the polls, the voting process and the information environment are still not secure. AP Photo/David Goldman

Threats remain to US voting system – and voters’ perceptions of reality

Protecting democracy requires more than just technical solutions. It includes education, critical thinking and members of society working together to agree on problems and find solutions.

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