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Articles sur Gender equality

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Spain’s Alexia Putellas, Jennifer Hermoso and Irene Paredes, from left, celebrate with the trophy at the end of the Women’s World Cup final between Spain and England at Stadium Australia in Sydney, Australia, on Aug. 20, 2023. (AP Photo/Abbie Parr)

The FIFA Women’s World Cup is closing its gap with the men’s tournament

The Women’s World Cup is emerging from the shadow of its male counterpart, breaking attendance records and drawing a global audience.This surge in popularity is a win for gender equality.
Spain’s Esther González holds the trophy celebrating at the end of the Women’s World Cup soccer final between Spain and England at Stadium Australia in Sydney, Australia, on Aug. 20, 2023. (AP Photo/Abbie Parr)

FIFA Women’s World Cup successes reflect gender gap differences between countries

By examining the FIFA Women’s World Cup performances, we can gain insights into the efforts countries are making to address gender inequality beyond sports.
Tourists walk past the Olympic rings in front of Paris City Hall with one year until the Paris 2024 Olympic Games opening ceremony, on July 26, 2023. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Gender inequality will still be an issue at the Paris 2024 Olympics — despite the Games being gender-balanced

The IOC needs to look beyond gender parity and work with international federations to address athletes’ conditions of participation in sports to achieve true gender equality.
(Clockwise from left): American civil war soldier Frances Hook; 19th century Dahomey women soldiers; defending a besieged German city in 1615; 18th century British soldier Hannah Snell and Union soldier Frances Clayton. Sources: Wikimedia Commons, Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbuettel

Friday essay: the forgotten female soldiers who fought long ago – and why their stories matter today

Fighting in sieges, an army of crack female troops, cross-dressing as male soldiers: women have survived and thrived as part of the war machine. But they’re rarely included in military histories.
Uber wealthy couples are rather traditional when it comes to who works and who doesn’t. EXTREME-PHOTOGRAPHER/E+ via Getty Images

Most super rich couples have breadwinning husbands and stay-at-home wives, contrasting sharply with everyone else

While most heterosexual couples are dual-earners, super rich couples continue to have gender-traditional arrangements in which the man is the sole breadwinner.
Although younger couples tend to share household labour more equitably, women still take on the bulk of home and family responsibilities. (Shutterstock)

The pandemic deepened gender inequality in dual-career households

At the beginning of the pandemic, it was predicted that the shift to remote work would lead to more equal division of domestic labour. Recent research shows this was not the case.

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