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Articles sur George W Bush

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken, left, is visible as President Joe Biden holds a virtual meeting with the Mexican president at the White House in March 2021. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Joe Biden’s first 100 days: A nostalgia for past foreign policy bravado?

What do Biden's first 100 days in office mean for the next four years in terms of foreign policy? There are already some clues — but questions too.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt, standing at center and facing left just above the eagle, takes the presidential oath of office for the third time in 1941. FDR Presidential Library and Museum via Flickr

Has any US president ever served more than eight years?

Only one president has done so – Franklin Delano Roosevelt – but others considered it, and even tried.
The White House never provided the National Archives with an official transcript of what Trump said at this rally in Louisville, Kentucky, on March 20, 2017. John Minchillo/AP Photo

Trump, defying custom, hasn’t given the National Archives records of his speeches at political rallies

All presidents must deposit transcriptions of their public statements with the National Archives. But in the case of Donald Trump, there's something missing.
Is Sen. Marco Rubio, espousing a polished populism, the future of the GOP? Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A less Trumpy version of Trumpism might be the future of the Republican Party

Donald Trump's ticket to the White House was a coarse version of populism. Will his successors in the GOP be different – or simply present a more polished version of his antagonistic rhetoric?
Trump falsely declaring a win in the early hours of Nov. 4, 2020, the day after the US election, as ballot counting continued in Pennsylvania and other battleground states. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

History tells us that a contested election won’t destroy American democracy

Five of the six disputed presidential elections in US history were resolved and the country moved on -- but one ended in civil war. What will happen if the 2020 election is contested?
President Donald Trump at the Tulsa campaign rally, where he said he had slowed down COVID-19 testing to keep the numbers low. Win McNamee/Getty Images

Leaders like Trump fail if they cannot speak the truth and earn trust

The absence of trust in a nation's leader and government jeopardizes an effective response to a health crisis. It also creates a political crisis, a loss of faith in democracy.
President Donald Trump makes a statement to the press in the Rose Garden about restoring “law and order” in the wake of protests. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Can the president really order the military to occupy US cities and states?

President Trump has warned that he will send the military into states to curb protests. Is Trump’s warning bluster? Or does the president have the authority to send the military into American cities?
Good old days: Before the coronavirus hit, governors, like California’s Gavin Newsom, had easier jobs. AP/Rich Pedroncelli, Pool

Plummeting tax revenues will put governors in tough budget situations

As Congress considers further financial help for victims of the coronavirus pandemic, the magnitude of the fiscal crisis that governors and their states will have to face is just starting to emerge.
Benny Marty/Shutterstock.com

US and Iran have a long, troubled history

Some of the major events in US-Iran relations highlight the differences between the nations' views, but others presented real opportunities for reconciliation.
Donald Trump is no Richard Nixon. And that’s why he’ll never willingly leave office in 2020. (The Associated Press)

Trump will cling to power — and Republicans will cling to him

Trump will survive the impeachment process in 2020, no matter what malfeasance comes to light. The Republicans will protect their man at all costs.
A protester wearing a Guy Fawkes mask flashing a victory sign in Beirut in November 2019. EPA-EFE/WAEL HAMZEH EPA-EFE/WAEL HAMZEH

Can wars no longer be won?

Wars don't produce winners and losers – they never really did.
North Carolina Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote in December 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

The Electoral College will never make everyone happy

A quirk of mathematics gives voters in some small states, like Rhode Island and Nebraska, an extra edge over voters in other states. This happens not only in the US, but in other countries, too.

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