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Articles sur Intimate partner violence

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 37 articles

Women may delay leaving an abusive partner if they co-own a pet. (Pexels)

People in abusive relationships face many barriers to leaving — pets should not be one

Canada must consider funding programs that allow abuse victims and survivors to bring their pets with them when they leave their partners.
Salon workers – who are usually women – report clients sharing details of domestic violence, health issues and heartbreak. Karen Perez/Unsplash

More than skin deep, beauty salons are places of sharing and caring

While popular portrayals of hairdressers and beauticians present them as "bimbos", salons can also provide a refuge for clients to share painful realities.
Intimate violence victims fare better with coordinated help. Shutterstock, photo illustration by Dragana Gordic

Don’t make intimate violence victims look for help – research shows they fare better when police and community organizations coordinate assistance

Women and children remain vulnerable to harm even after intimate violence has occurred. Coordinating a community's response can help avoid educational, employment, social, housing and legal problems.
Many behaviours associated with coercive control are not yet criminal in Australia, even though the impact on victims is profound. Shutterstock

It’s time ‘coercive control’ was made illegal in Australia

New laws in the UK have led to convictions for a range of deplorable behaviours used to control partners in relationships. It's time Australia reconsidered introducing such legislation here.
Dementia patients are often the perpetrators and often the victims of abuse. Research also shows that a medical history of head injury can more than double the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease in some populations, even after many years. (Shutterstock)

Dementia’s hidden darkness: Violence and domestic abuse

From aggressive patients with Alzheimer's to frustrated caregivers, dementia is increasingly entwined with violence in private homes and residential facilities.
One third of women will suffer violence at the hands of someone they love, sometimes resulting in traumatic brain injury. Here, women lay on the street to protest this violence, in Pamplona in northern Spain, in 2015. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)

Traumatic brain injury: The unseen impact of domestic violence

Globally, one third of women suffer violence at the hands of someone they love. And for those who survive domestic abuse, traumatic head injury can be the devastating outcome.
On International Women’s Day in 2016, a demonstrator carries a cross that reads in Spanish: “For you, for all” to protest violence against women. International Women’s Day is much more widely celebrated in Latin America than it is in Canada and the United States, but injustices for women is a global phenomenon. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

International Women’s Day: Reminder women must keep fighting — everywhere

Women everywhere have low status relative to men. This is a global phenomenon and there are no exceptions, and there is much work to be done in Canada and everywhere. The time is now.

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