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Articles sur Robots

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Tiny fuel cells convert sweat to electricity that can power sensors in electronic skin. Yu et al., Sci. Robot. 5, eaaz7946 (2020)

A smart second skin gets all the power it needs from sweat

Lightweight, flexible materials can be used to make health-monitoring wearable devices, but powering the devices is a challenge. Using fuel cells instead of batteries could make the difference.
A nurse (left) operates a robot used to interact remotely with coronavirus patients while a physician looks on. MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP via Getty Images

Robots are playing many roles in the coronavirus crisis – and offering lessons for future disasters

Robots are helping health care workers and public safety officials more safely and quickly treat coronavirus patients and contain the pandemic. They have something in common: They're tried and tested.
On March 18, 2020, a student configures a modified medical robot to screen and observe patients with VIDOC-19 at the Regional Robotics Technology Centre at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. LILLIAN SUWANRUMPHA/AFP

Can robots help us overcome the coronavirus health crisis and lockdown?

With the enhanced capabilities of today's robots and drones, recent examples from China and Thailand and ongoing research show that they have the potential to help us navigate disasters.
Toys are becoming increasingly advanced, but this can be more of a hindrance than a perk. Pixabay

Robots, AI and drones: when did toys turn into rocket science?

At Christmas shopping, you may have noticed toys are becoming very complex. They fly, hop, jump and follow you around – some even need to be 'connected'. But why are we seeing such technical advances?
A recent study conducted by Brookings Institute researchers found artificial intelligence could “affect work in virtually every occupational group”. However, it’s yet to be seen exactly how jobs will be impacted. SHUTTERSTOCK

Work is a fundamental part of being human. Robots won’t stop us doing it

As machine automation and artificial intelligence surge, there's paranoia our jobs will be overrun by robots. But even if this happens, work won't disappear, because humans need it.

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