Articles sur Songbirds

Affichage de 1 à 20 de 34 articles

The New Zealand robin is a small and ordinary-looking songbird, but it can take down enormous invertebrate prey and hide morsels for later consumption. Supplied

A small New Zealand songbird that hides food for later use provides insights into cognitive evolution

The New Zealand robin has learnt to hide left-over food for later consumption, and it turns out that male birds with the best spatial memory have the greatest breeding success.
Vocal learning in birds is a lot like how people learn language. Alexandra Giese/Shutterstock.com

Complex birdsongs help biologists piece together the evolution of lifelong learning

Could mating preferences, like females preferring males who sing complex songs, affect the evolution of learning? Insights from birds could have clues for how people learn throughout their lives.
Bank swallows, like this juvenile, may become endangered unless habitat loss and other threats are reduced. Shutterstock

How birders helped pinpoint hotspots for migratory bird conservation

A collection of millions of bird sightings has identified the best places to invest in conservation.
Like many migratory songbirds, tree swallows are experiencing population declines in parts of their breeding range. Julia Baak

Birds wearing backpacks trace a path to conservation

Effective conservation of migratory songbirds requires an understanding of how populations are connected between seasons. The challenge is being able to track individuals throughout the entire year.
Pied butcherbirds, such as this one, sing solos, duos and trios. © Duade Paton

Birdsong has inspired humans for centuries: is it music?

Is birdsong simply a hard-wired, functional, primitive sound – or could we call it 'music'? Australia's pied butcherbirds show there are surprising overlaps between birds' and humans' musical abilities.
Red-breasted Nuthatches are irrupting this winter across North America. Heather Elaine Ritchie/Flickr

When birds go roaming: The mystery of avian irruptions

During bird irruptions, hundreds or thousands of a single species show up outside their normal territory. Most of what we know about irruptions comes from data collected by citizen scientists.

Les contributeurs les plus fréquents

Plus