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Articles sur Visual art

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Visitors take in Cameron Robbins’ Field Lines at the Museum of Old and New Art. Mona/Remi Chauvin

Dark Mofo and the affective power of a creative storm

Hobart's winter festival explores darkness, storms and the very nature of the universe, with artwork performed in an asylum; echoing the elements and conceived while on a residency at Geneva's Centre for Nuclear Research.
Rome’s Trevi fountain lit up with the Belgian flag. Why do some violent acts prompt global artistic memorial, but not others? Stefano Rellandini/Reuters

Art and terror: a new kind of memorial

From Tintin weeping to spotlit buildings, images are rapidly circulating on social media as a way of comprehending the Brussels bombings. But where was the cartoon for those who died in Ankara? Are some tragedies "ungrievable"?
Casuarina trees were the perfect metaphor for Blumann’s life and the state of the world. Detail from Elise Blumann, On the Swan, Nedlands, 1942, Oil on composition board, 55.6x66.4cm. University of Western Australia.

Here’s looking at: On the Swan by Elise Blumann

Casuarina trees and the tortured forms of the Melaleucas on the foreshore of the Swan River were the perfect metaphor for Blumann's life and the world before and during the second world war.
Weiwei has taken Denmark to task for its asylum-seeker policy. Australia, for now, is another issue. EPA/Filip Singer

Ai Weiwei has pulled his work from Denmark – should Melbourne be next?

Weiwei has taken Denmark to task for its asylum-seeker policy. Given Australia's decision to return 267 asylum seekers to Nauru, he should surely consider pulling his current Melbourne exhibition.
Visitors look at the painting The Visit from 1939 by Paul Delvaux during the 2011 exhibition Surrealism in Paris. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann

Explainer: Surrealism

As the longest-running avant-garde movement of the 20th century, Surrealism's scope and richness is perhaps unparalleled in its influence of modern art and culture.
Guy Grey-Smith’s Rottnest connects strongly to the land. Detail from Guy Grey-Smith, Rottnest, 1954-57, oil on canvas, 61.2x76.5 cm (h,w), The University of Western Australia Art Collection, Tom Collins Bequest Fund, 1957, © The University of Western Australia

Here’s looking at: Rottnest by Guy Grey-Smith

Guy Grey-Smith's painting showcases the insistent rhythms of the indigenous vegetation and the rolling, flowing movements that take our eye meandering across the landscape and back towards the horizon.
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Click here for art

That traditional monolith of culture, the museum, has begun to embrace the digital world. As a series of projects reveal, the possibilities are endless.
It’s time to look back on a year of art and culture. Blake Danger Bentley. Melbourne street art

2015, the year that was: Arts + Culture

It's another year in Arts + Culture, so in case you missed it we've collected all the best coverage of screen, theatre, music, books and culture in one place.
The NGV’s summer blockbuster packs a double whammy. © Ai Weiwei; Andy Warhol artwork © 2015 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./ARS, New York. Licensed by Viscopy, Sydney.

Andy Warhol – Ai Weiwei: the American and Chinese centuries meet in Melbourne

The NGV's summer exhibition is curated to create a dialogue between Ai Weiwei and Andy Warhol, and this conversation operates on multiple levels on a variety of themes, and across time and space.
Art demonstrated it still has the power to inspire, and maybe even change the world. A man carries a self-portrait painted by Australian death row prisoner Myuran Sukumaran. Beawiharta

What 2015 looked like in visual art

There are as many ways to summarise a "year in art" as there are eyes to look at art with. Art had some shining – and not-so-shining – moments in 2015.
Why is this seemingly unintelligible mess of house paint revered as a masterpiece? Detail: Jackson Pollock. Blue poles. 1952. © Pollock-Krasner Foundation/ARS

Here’s looking at: Blue poles by Jackson Pollock

Gough Whitlam’s government paid $A1.3 million for Jackson Pollock's Blue poles in 1973. But why exactly is this 'seemingly unintelligible mess of house paint' revered as a masterpiece?

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