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Articles sur Visual art

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The viewer is asked to suspend disbelief and journey through the realms of the unconscious. James Gleeson. We inhabit the corrosive littoral of habit 1940. Oil on canvas. 40.7x51.3cm. © Courtesy of the artist’s estate

Lurid Beauty: Australian Surrealism and its Echoes – reviewed

Lurid Beauty is the first major examination of Australian Surrealism and its profound impact on Australian art from the 1930s to the present day. So how does it all hang together?
Parke raises important questions about whether humanism is desirable or even possible in photography today. Exhibition space, Monash Gallery of Art.

The camera is god: photographer Trent Parke grapples with an impossible humanism

The title of Parke's current exhibition alludes to a 19th-century faith in the camera’s mechanical vision as superior to human vision – while also complicating that assumption for modern viewers.
The marketing of Australian art largely remains a provincial exercise within a global art environment. Image: Sydney Contemporary Art Fair, 2015. AAP Image/NEWZULU/THINKING MEDIA

Friday essay: the art market is failing Australian artists

Despite rhetoric positioning Australia as a clever and creative country, its artists, particularly in the visual arts, are doing it tough, and things are progressing from bad to worse. Why is that?
Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei’s deft use of social media has enabled him to gather worldwide support in his fight against censorship. AAP One

The building blocks of dissidence: Chinese artist Ai Weiwei and #Legogate

What makes Ai Wei Wei so powerful? Critics say if he didn't exist, he'd need to be invented: an artist who's combined his life and art into a politically charged performance that helps define how we see modern China.
Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin, Trace fiber from Freud’s couch under crossed polars with Quartz wedge compensator (#1), 2015, unique jacquard woven tapestry, 2.9m x 2m. © Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin

Forensic analysis of skin dust from Freud’s couch leaves much to be desired

In the middle of a rose garden, on a leafy road in northwest London, nestles the Freud Museum – though the petals, in October, are tumbling. The house, at 20 Maresfield Gardens, is the proud bearer of…
The use of live animals in the visual arts provokes important ethic questions. Pictured: Pierre Huyghe Untilled (2011-2012). Courtesy the artist; Marian Goodman Gallery, New York, Paris; Esther Schipper, Berlin.

Contemporary art, animals and ethics: Pierre Huyghe’s interspecies worlds

An exhibition of works by contemporary French artist Pierre Huyghe raises questions around the ethical treatment of animals by artists - and whether live animals have a place in the visual arts.
Lucy Kemp-Welch, Horses bathing in the sea, 1900. Oil on canvas. Estate of Lucy Kemp-Welch. National Gallery of Victoria

The Horse: reframing the history of human progress

The Horse, currently on display at the National Gallery of Victoria, celebrates the pivotal role the horse has played in the evolution of civilisation.
‘Children who are yet to be born need to know their place in the never-ending story.’ Warangkula family portrait alongside Warangkula Court street sign. Photo: Helen Puckey

Streets of Papunya delivers an artistic renaissance worth celebrating

Succeeding generations need to know where they are placed in the unfolding grand narrative of Aboriginal art. Those of us who are not Aboriginal need to understand the complex relationship between settler Australians and the people of the land.
Who, exactly, was Catherine II, Catherine the Great, Empress of Russia? Catherine II by Fyodor Rokotov. The Hermitage/ Wikimedia Commons.

Why Catherine the Great’s ‘greatness’ doesn’t grate

Masterpieces from the Hermitage: The legacy of Catherine the Great is currently on show at the National Gallery of Victoria. But who, exactly was Catherine II, the Empress of Russia?
We need to consider what balance we want to achieve between the heritage and contemporary arts. AAP Image/Julian Smith. Artists of the Australian Ballet rehearse for the The Dream.

Majors and the majority: planning for Australia’s artistic legacy starts now

Given the pressure being applied to the majority of people working in the arts sector, we would be foolish not to consider the roles and inherited rights of Australia's major performing companies.

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