In India, a light complexion is associated with power, status and beauty, fueling an innovative and growing market of skin-bleaching products. Adam Jones/Flickr

Bleached girls: India and its love for light skin

Indian girls grow up in an environment where they are constantly reminded that fair is beautiful.
Women still only make up a small percentage of the Australian game development industry. What’s being done to change this? from www.shutterstock.com

More women are becoming game developers, but there’s a long way to go

Women are making inroads in the gaming industry but progress is slow. We need more flexible workplaces, and perhaps even hiring quotas, to fix the gender imbalance.
President Macron, President Trump and First Lady Trump attend the 2017 Bastille Day military parade. Yves Herman/REUTERS

Emmanuel Macron staged a punk coup on the Champs-Élysées

The French president's orchestration of the Bastille Day military parade featuring a Daft Punk tune was a deft move that left Trump outmaneuvered, and positioned France as a force to contend with.
Trinidad’s semi-professional cricket, long a feeder for Caribbean cricketers to play broad, has lost of its lustre. Tom Hodgkinson/flickr

Can Caribbean cricket get its (political) groove back?

Once a sport associated with anti-colonialism, cricket in the Caribbean has become a career path for young men with dreams of wealth and glamour.
Master Mansions today. From Fourthwall Books’ ‘Master Mansions’ (2017) by Mark Lewis and Tanya Zack. Mark Lewis/ Fourthwall Books

Keeping your hat on in Jo'burg: changing times of an Indian migrant milliner

Apartheid was to officially end in 1994. So was the fashion of wearing hats as the formalities of business, church and leisure gave way to the informality of urban equality.
The Mummy, in its 2017 rendition, rehashes an 80-year-old franchise focused on revived Egyptian corpses. AlloCine

Why we love (and fear) mummies

Mummies are scary but they also fascinate us, giving us the feeling that we can vanquish time by preserving our most perishable feature: flesh.
A Muslim bride waits to take vows that could be instantly broken via SMS. Danish Siddiqui /Reuters

Muslim ‘instant divorce’ law divides India

India's Supreme Court could soon rule to abolish "triple talaq", a practice that allows Muslim men to divorce their wives instantaneously and discriminates against women.

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