Wooden stakes representing the 2,224 confirmed overdose deaths in British Columbia - many of them young Indigenous people - over the last three years, are placed on the ground at Oppenheimer Park, in Vancouver on September 29, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

Indigenous women suffer greatest risk of injury

A bottlenose dolphin leaping from the ocean in Panama. Christian Wittman/Shutterstock.com

Researchers find pathological signs of Alzheimer’s in dolphins, whose brains are much like humans’

Researchers have found evidence of the same brain pathologies in dolphins that are present in the brains of humans who died with Alzheimer's. What might this suggest about Alzheimer's in humans?
A painting on a rickshaw in Yogyakarta depicts Javanese men rubbing coins on each other’s back. Vladimir Wrangel/Shutterstock.com

Got a cold? In coin rubbing Indonesians trust

Coin rubbing, a traditional treatment for the common cold, is still widely used by modern Indonesians despite criticism that it is not rational.
Some research studies have found light to moderate drinking to be protective of heart health; others have found long term drinking to be damaging. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Is drinking wine really good for your heart?

Is a glass or two of red wine good for your heart? What about your cholesterol and blood pressure? Our experts explain the controversies.
Plush toys, recovered from a flooded home, hang out to dry on a wrought iron gate in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. Ramon Espinosa/AP

The mental health toll of Puerto Rico’s prolonged power outages

Long after the hurricane's over and the power comes back, residents can still experience lasting mental health issues.
Trade and investment agreements can increase consumption of unhealthy foods, sugary drinks and tobacco – leading to soaring rates of obesity and chronic diseases globally. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

The hidden connection between obesity, heart disease and trade

As government representatives meet at the WHO global conference on noncommunicable diseases in Uruguay this week, their focus should be on reducing the health impacts of trade deals.
As North America’s opioid crisis worsens, schools across Canada are purchasing naloxone anti-overdose kits. Research suggests that risks of opioid addiction could also be addressed through attention to children’s nutrition. (Shutterstock)

Sugar in the diet may increase risks of opioid addiction

High fructose corn syrup in food and drinks has long been linked to rising rates of child and teen obesity. New evidence suggests it increases the risks of opioid addiction and overdose too.
Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
Workers clear debris on Sept. 25, 2017 from the top of a building that collapsed in Mexico City after the Sept. 19 earthquake. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Mexico’s road to recovery after quakes is far longer than it looks

Natural disasters are not only bad in the short term. Many families will see their health, well-being and ability to escape poverty affected for decades, and some will be affected for life.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, HIV is still highly stigmatised. MSF/Tommy Trenchard

HIV is still taboo in the DRC: chronicles from Kinshasa

HIV remains a synonym for death in Kinshasa and many leave testing and treatment until it's too late. It's not common knowledge that an infected person can live a normal and healthy life.

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