Physical activity has long been considered a way to lower risk for breast cancer. vectorfusionart/Shutterstock.com

How inherited fitness may affect breast cancer risk

Physical activity is considered an important way to lower risk for breast cancer. But what if your ability to be fit is influenced by genes you inherit? Would that raise your risk? In rats, it did.
Workers clear debris on Sept. 25, 2017 from the top of a building that collapsed in Mexico City after the Sept. 19 earthquake. AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell

Mexico’s road to recovery after quakes is far longer than it looks

Natural disasters are not only bad in the short term. Many families will see their health, well-being and ability to escape poverty affected for decades, and some will be affected for life.
In the Democratic Republic of Congo, HIV is still highly stigmatised. MSF/Tommy Trenchard

HIV is still taboo in the DRC: chronicles from Kinshasa

HIV remains a synonym for death in Kinshasa and many leave testing and treatment until it's too late. It's not common knowledge that an infected person can live a normal and healthy life.
Ecuador’s school snack programme focuses on pre-packaged, individual-sized items like juice boxes. Bernardo Cañizares Esguerra

Ecuador’s school food is bad for kids — and the environment

Up to 25% of Ecuadorian children suffer from malnutrition, and the country's sugary school snacks aren't helping. Kids need healthful, fresh food — not high-calorie humanitarian aid.
A young breast-cancer patient in her home. Fototip/Shutterstock

Is cancer just a question of ‘bad luck’?

Two US researchers have traced the majority of cancers to DNA replication errors during our natural cell replacement. Their finding asks for a renewed inquiry into the role of "chance" in cancer.

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