Articles on Charlottesville attack

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Mourners embrace at a vigil for Richard Collins III, who was stabbed to death in College Park, Maryland. AP Photo/Brian Witte

Are many hate crimes really examples of domestic terrorism?

Like the death of Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, the murder of Richard Collins III was a symptom of violent extremism that should be treated accordingly.
Online hate isn’t always as easy to spot as it might appear. Lukasz Stefanski/Shutterstock.com

What is the online equivalent of a burning cross?

Two websites, one taken offline, the other still active, raise hard questions about how prepared Americans are to deal with free speech about white supremacy, in both monuments and domain names.
Protesters with opposing views face off at a ‘Free Speech’ rally in Boston. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

Warning signs of mass violence – in the US?

Two genocide and mass atrocity prevention scholars argue Trump's response to the Charlottesville attack is a red flag.
Ryan Kelly’s iconic photograph of the moment that James Fields’ car plowed into a crowd of protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia. Ryan M. Kelly/AP

Is Ryan Kelly’s iconic photograph an American ‘Guernica’?

Ryan Kelly's iconic photograph from Charlottesville evokes a 'Unite the Right' moment from 1937 – and the anti-war masterpiece by Picasso that emerged from it.
Gord Downie, the poetic lead singer of the Tragically Hip whose determined fight with brain cancer inspired a nation, has died. He was 53. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young)

Remembering Gord Downie through his lyrics

Good songs are like good poetry. Literature professor Robert Morrison reflects on The Tragically Hip's best song, "Ahead by a Century," and explains the politics of hope within the tune.
Did Trump’s rhetoric played a part in radicalizing the far-right protesters in Charlottesville? AP Photo/Steve Helber

Charlottesville and the politics of fear

Trump is a master of using anger to motivate his base. An anti-terrorism researcher explains how to stem the tide.
The Robert E. Lee statue for which the ‘Unite the Right’ rally was organized to protest its removal in Charlottesville, Virginia. EPA/TASOS KATOPODIS

From Charlottesville to Nazi Germany, sometimes monuments have to fall

The violence sparked by the removal of Confederate statues in the US shows the ideas that collect around historical monuments. Sometimes it's better to remove them; yet they can be an important way of remembering trauma.

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