Articles on Cooking

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‘The Queens Closet Opened,’ first published in 1655, shared recipes and support for the deposed monarchy. Here, portrait of Charles I and Queen Henrietta Maria, by Anthony van Dyck, 1632. (Arcidiecézní muzeum Kroměříž/Wikimedia)

Cooking in the coronavirus crisis is much more fun with old secrets from the Queen’s pantry

Recipe sharing is all the rage in the pandemic as in other times of turmoil. English cookbooks of the 16th and 17th centuries promised recipes for comfort with a dash of glamour.
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Great time to try: baking sourdough bread

If you haven't already, join the sourdough revolution. Being home means you can tend to your starter, satisfy carb cravings, bake healthier bread and impress your friends on social media.
Self-isolating may mean many Canadians will be forced to spend more time in the kitchen, a place that’s been foreign to most millennials, according to a new survey. (Shutterstock)

Making and breaking bread during the coronavirus pandemic: Home cooking could make a comeback

One positive thing coming out of pandemic-related self-isolation could be that people will spend more time in their kitchens, a place where fewer Canadians have ventured in recent years.
Researchers May Nango, Djaykuk Djandjomerr and S. Anna Florin collecting plants in Kakadu National Park. Reproduced with permission of Gundjeihmi Aboriginal Corporation. Elspeth Hayes

65,000-year-old plant remains show the earliest Australians spent plenty of time cooking

Charred plant remains from one of the oldest archaeological sites reveal that the first Australians ate a varied - and sometimes labour-intensive - diet.
Need a handkerchief? Num LP Photo/Shutterstock

Why do onions make you cry?

Like many plants, onions have defenses to ward off creatures that may want to eat them. Their secret weapon is a kind of natural tear gas.
Leftovers, as one French chef put it, ‘can be as good as, if not better than, the first time they are served.’ Tom Grundy/Shutterstock.com

What to do with those Thanksgiving leftovers? Look to the French

It doesn't have to be a week of tiresome turkey sandwiches. A food historian explains how the French came to see leftovers as an outlet for creativity and experimentation.
Getting a healthy meal on the table every night is a challenge for many mothers. ESB Professional/Shutterstock.com

Time to cook is a luxury many families don’t have

Celebrity chefs often preach about the ease of home cooking and meal planning. But for most mothers juggling a job, child care, housework and meal prep, this is virtually impossible.
In a recent research study, around 10 per cent of the recipes examined contained unsafe food preparation instructions. (Shutterstock)

How to safely handle food and avoid salmonella

A food safety expert offers six tips on safe food handling that many cookbooks and cooking shows fail to deliver.
Libraries are offering new and innovative things that belie their historic image as silent places to read.

7 unexpected things that libraries offer besides books

With advancements in technology, libraries are offering much more than something to read. A library researcher offers a sampling of some unexpected items that library patrons can check out these days.
Eating right is good for families. Monkey Business Images/Shutterstock.com

An app that nudges people to eat their veggies only works when it’s introduced with a human touch

Many of the low-income people who do use VeggieBook after downloading it at food pantries are eating more nutritious meals, often with more focused family time at the table.
Reading recipes enhances vocabulary. Baking involves measurement, addition and subtraction. Slicing your personal pizza is a great way to explain fractions to your child. (Shutterstock)

The gift of cooking: Five fun and healthy recipe books for kids

Research shows that cooking with your kids helps them try more foods, eat more healthily and waste less food. It also offers opportunities to practise math and bond as a family.
I had never encountered the word ‘curry muncher’ until I arrived in Australia 10 years ago. Shutterstock

Essays On Air: the politics of curry

The politics of curry. The Conversation30.4 MB (download)
Whether being called 'curry munchers' or pigeonholed as authorities on a dish largely invented by the British, diasporic South Asians are emulsified in a deep pool of curry.

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