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Articles on Face masks

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Will the pandemic influence schools’ return to practical skills traditionally gained through home economics? (Shutterstock)

Pandemic sewing surge is a chance to rediscover the practical arts

Some designers, makers and consumers are imploring us not to stop sewing after the pandemic because of the potential for utilitarian, psychological and environmental benefits.
People wearing face masks to curb the spread of COVID-19 walk past a window display at a store in downtown Vancouver on Dec. 13, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Shopping for the holidays? Keep your distance from retail workers

During the COVID-19 pandemic, social distancing has become more than a safety regulation for those working in retail — it’s a sign of respect and an acknowledgement that they’re people too.
U.S. President Donald Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after spending time in hospital with a COVID-19 infection. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

How COVID-19 led to Donald Trump’s defeat

New research suggests that if Donald Trump had handled the COVID-19 pandemic better and kept outbreaks under control, he might have won the Nov. 3 election.
A man sips a drink while sitting in environmentally friendly physical distancing circle at Trinity Bellwoods Park in Toronto on May 28, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

COVID-19 caution fatigue: Why it happens, and 3 ways to prevent it

As the pandemic wears on, some people struggle to keep adhering to restrictions and social distancing guidelines. There are psychological reasons for caution fatigue, and ways to overcome it.
Teaching researchers and scientists communication skills — including social media proficiency — will help inform the public about new discoveries and research. (Shutterstock)

Scientists: Here’s how to fight back against anti-maskers, climate deniers and anti-vaxxers

Budget cuts and outsourcing content have affected the amount and quality of science journalism. Scientists should learn to communicate their own findings directly and clearly to the public.
New recommendation advise using an additional layer of polypropylene fabric in cloth masks to act as a filter. (Sara Alas/Niko Apparel)

Polypropylene, the material now recommended for COVID-19 mask filters: What it is, where to get it

Everything you need to know about non-woven polypropylene, the fabric now recommended for use as a filter in cloth face masks: What it is, what to look for and where to find it.
The second wave of COVID-19 requires what’s known as ‘norm entrepreneurs,’ well-known and influential people who can encourage people and businesses to adhere to coronavirus containment measures. (Patrick Fore/Unsplash)

COVID-19 crackdowns: Fines are fine but bring on the ‘norm entrepreneurs’

A chorus of prominent voices that seek to persuade Canadians that COVID-19 compliance is in everyone’s interest.
Business restrictions early in the pandemic, when rural towns had few cases, triggered a backlash that haunts them now. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

In rural America, resentment over COVID-19 shutdowns is colliding with rising case numbers

Coronavirus cases have risen sharply across the Mountain West, Midwest and plains. Over 70% of nonmetropolitan counties are now “red zones,” suggesting viral spread is out of control.
It’s tempting to take a break from pandemic precautions. Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Sick of COVID-19? Here’s why you might have pandemic fatigue

It’s draining and depressing to stay on high alert month after month after month. Understanding pandemic fatigue better might help you strengthen your resolve.
Although cloth masks have been widely adopted, many people still have questions about them. (Usplash/Vera Davidova)

COVID-19 masks FAQs: How can cloth stop a tiny virus? What’s the best fabric? Do they protect the wearer?

Epidemiologists reviewed 25 studies of cloth face masks. Here’s what they found out about how well they work, why they work, who they protect and why the mosquito and chain-link fence analogy is wrong.
Molina speaking about climate change at the Guadalajara International Book Fair in Mexico, Nov. 2018. Leonardo Alvarez/Getty Images

Remembering Mario Molina, Nobel Prize-winning chemist who pushed Mexico on clean energy – and, recently, face masks

Molina, who died on Oct. 8, ‘thought climate change was the biggest problem in the world long before most people did.’ His research on man-made depletion of the ozone layer won the 1995 Nobel Prize.
A health-care worker is seen wearing full personal protective equipment outside the Royal Columbian Hospital in New Westminster, B.C. on April 3, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Heath-care workers lacking PPE suffer from more anxiety and depression

Health-care workers’ access to personal protective equipment, along with appropriate infection control procedures, affected their mental health during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

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