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Articles on Herd immunity

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Vaccination has saved millions of lives throughout the course of history. Phynart Studio/E+ from Getty Images

Millions are rejecting one of humanity’s best weapons for saving lives: Vaccines

Vaccines have successfully curtailed viral diseases for decades. But as COVID-19 vaccination hesitancy shows, mistrust and misinformation continue to put lives at risk.
Little work has been done to understand young people’s willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccines. Above: a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the University of Toronto Mississauga campus on May 6. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin 

How to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake and decrease vaccine hesitancy in young people

As vaccine eligibility is expanded to adolescents and young adults, understanding who might be more likely to be vaccine hesitant, and why, can help inform public health strategies
Monterey Mushrooms, an agricultural employer in California, teamed up with its union and the local county to get its workers vaccinated. AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

3 ways employers could help fight vaccine skepticism

Surveys suggest people trust companies more than government and the media, showing they have an important role in helping end the pandemic.
Avian cholera is a highly contagious disease that has produced rapid population loss in Northern common eiders. (Shutterstock)

How Arctic sea ducks develop herd immunity from avian cholera

We can learn about the spread of diseases through populations by studying naturally occurring instances of herd immunity. Avian cholera in the Canadian Arctic provides a useful case study.
Medical students’ backgrounds often reflect the diversity of local communities, which can allow them more access and trust for vaccination efforts. Bryan Goodchild/UMass Medical School

We’re building a vaccine corps of medical and nursing students – they could transform how we reach underserved areas

One university is showing how the vaccine corps concept can speed up vaccination rates, including launching a large-scale vaccination site staffed by hundreds of students and volunteers.
Maria Saravia, a worker at the University of Southern California’s Keck Hospital, adjusts her mother’s mask before her COVID-19 vaccination. Genaro Molina/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Why the next major hurdle to ending the pandemic will be about persuading people to get vaccinated

Getting a vaccine is proving difficult for many older people now, but the mad rush for the vaccine won’t last long. Many people don’t want to get one at all, and that will impede herd immunity.
Joe Biden, then president-elect, received his COVID-19 vaccination in December. Joshua Roberts via Getty Images

Can Biden fix the vaccine mess? An expert says yes

The COVID-19 vaccine rollout has fallen far short of President Trump’s promises. President Biden says he can fix that. Can he?

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