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Articles on Indigenous health

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A still from the animated Heart Foundation video encouraging Aboriginal people to get a heart check. Author provided

Yarns from the heart: the role of Aboriginal English in Indigenous health communication

Indigenous people in Australia experience poorer health outcomes than non-Indigenous Australians. So it’s crucial health messaging is delivered in culturally appropriate ways.
Inuit in the Qikiqtaaluk (Baffin) region must travel long distances south to receive specialized health-care services. (Janet Jull)

Inuit cancer patients often face difficult decisions without support far from home

Inuit living in their traditional territory must travel long distances — often with no personal support — for specialized health-care services like cancer care, obstetrics and dialysis.
People embrace in front of the Centennial Flame on Parliament Hill at a memorial for the 215 children whose remains were found at the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

As an Indigenous doctor, I see the legacy of residential schools and ongoing racism in today’s health care

A commitment to eliminating racism must be reflected in accountability mechanisms that focus on the impacts of coordinated and consistent anti-racist action.
Gathering on the land: Indigenous ways of knowing can ensure that communities reclaim and promote health and healing. (Melody Morton-Ninomiya)

Indigenous community research partnerships can help address health inequities

Many researchers may lack resources to guide them in conducting research that is equitable, inclusive and respectful of diverse Indigenous knowledge, ethics, practice and research sovereignty.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don’t Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

When COVID-19 first appeared, some called it the great equalizer. But the facts quickly revealed a grim reality: COVID-19 disproportionately impacts racialized communities.
Indigenous people with experience guiding culturally safe talking circles in an online environment can work with students to nurture safe virtual spaces. (Shutterstock)

How universities can support Indigenous online learners in the COVID-19 pandemic

Student respondents to a survey discussed memories of historical trauma of infectious disease and displacement, financial hardship related to Alberta tuition hikes and mental health concerns.
A water bottle sits on the table in front of Chief and NDP candidate Rudy Turtle during a visit by NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh on Oct. 5, 2019 on the Grassy Narrows First Nation, where industrial mercury poisoning in its water system has seriously affected the health of the community. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

A sin tax on sugary drinks unfairly targets Indigenous communities instead of improving health

A tax on sugar-sweetened beverages may be intended to improve health, but for Indigenous consumers, such a tax would be unethical, contravene tax law and undermine Indigenous rights.
Loneliness affects one in three people in the industrialized world, with racialized groups disproportionately bearing the burden. (Pexels/EricW)

Cancer and loneliness: How inclusion could save lives

Pluralism — the active process of inclusion — could reduce disparities in some of the most pressing health issues of our time.

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