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Articles on Radio waves

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Mysterious blasts of radio waves from across the universe called fast radio bursts are getting more attention from astronomers. ESO/M. Kornmesser

535 new fast radio bursts help answer deep questions about the universe and shed light on these mysterious cosmic events

Fast radio bursts are the focus of a young and fascinating field of astronomy. Researchers just released data on more than 500 new bursts, quadrupling the total number of detected events.
The Wi-Fi symbol, like the technology it represents, has become ubiquitous. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

How does Wi-Fi work? An electrical engineer explains

Wi-Fi has become a fundamental part of modern digital life, but its foundation is the same as the technology that allowed your great-grandparents to listen to their favorite radio programs.
Pocket your phone without worry. Phone image via www.shutterstock.com.

Why you can’t fry eggs (or testicles) with a cellphone

Did your holiday gift list include radiation-shielding undies to protect your privates from cellphone radio waves? A radiation expert explains they’re unnecessary – your phone won’t affect your fertility.
The GLEAM view of the centre of the Milky Way, in radio colour. Red indicates the lowest frequencies, green indicates the middle frequencies and blue the highest frequencies. Each dot is a galaxy, with around 300,000 radio galaxies observed as part of the GLEAM survey. Natasha Hurley-Walker (Curtin / ICRAR) and the GLEAM Team

What the universe looks like when viewed with radio eyes

To the naked eye the universe we can see on a clear night is dotted with thousands of stars. See through radio eyes, then things look very different.
The vast expanse of Western Australia is perfect for radio astronomy. Pete Wheeler, ICRAR

Tuning in to cosmic radio from the dawn of time

The Murchison Widefield Array sits in remote Western Australia far from noisy civilisation so it can help us understand the universe by tuning into radio waves from the distant cosmos.
Jean Paul Santos with the finished 4x4 sub-array antenna assembly that may help rovers talk directly with Earth. Matthew Chin

Talking to Mars: new antenna design could aid interplanetary communication

New research provides a compact but powerful way for Mars rovers to communicate directly with Earth via an array of smaller antenna elements, bypassing the need for an intermediary.

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