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Articles on Social determinants of health

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Would anyone want to spend more screen time talking about pandemics? Yes, learned an anthropologist, biologist and historian who developed a course on the topic. (Shutterstock)

A university course on pandemics: What we learned when 80 experts, 300 alumni and 600 students showed up

The course offers a model for teaching about complex problems, and underlines the critical role of university learning, research and outreach in understanding and addressing them.
Each headstone in Minneapollis’ ‘Say Their Names’ cemetery represents a Black American killed by police – deaths that create a ripple effect of pain felt in Black communities nationwide. Jason Armond/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Pain of police killings ripples outward to traumatize Black people and communities across US

Evidence shows that many Black Americans experience police killings of unarmed Black people – even those they do not know – as traumatic events, causing acute physical and emotional distress.
Circles designed to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus by encouraging social distancing line San Francisco’s Dolores Park on May 21, 2020. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Bursting social bubbles after COVID-19 will make cities happier and healthier again

The social restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic have illustrated how important human connections are to health.
Dostoyevsky’s story ‘The Double’ explores the uncanny theme of a replica of oneself, but today’s literary foes are often amorphous ones like environmental degradation. (Shutterstock)

Fiction and memoirs were covering health way before the COVID-19 pandemic

Beyond the 'literature of madness,' the narratives about mental and physical health published today explore the interdependence of bodies and their environments.
In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don't Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

When COVID-19 first appeared, some called it the great equalizer. But the facts quickly revealed a grim reality: COVID-19 disproportionately impacts racialized communities.
This mural in-progress outside the Apple store in Montréal is a sign of antiracist allyship: will this work help society start to address the long-term health impacts of racism? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

5 ways to address internalized white supremacy and its impact on health

While many institutions pledged their support for anti-racism work this summer, a health researcher says these ideas need to go further to address the long-term health impacts of internalized racism.
Instead of returning to “normal” after the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada should adopt a health-care system that focuses on prevention and the social determinants of health. (Pixabay, Canva)

No ‘back to normal’ after COVID-19: Health care should shift focus from treatment to prevention

COVID-19 has shown the flaws of a reactive health-care system designed to care for people who are already sick. A preventive approach would be more equitable, less expensive and keep us healthier.
Mental health issues resulting from COVID-19 and efforts to contain it are the fourth wave of the pandemic. (Pixabay, Canva)

Mental health impact of coronavirus pandemic hits marginalized groups hardest

The pandemic's mental health toll is not distributed equally. Its impact is disproportionately felt by racialized groups, Indigenous Peoples, people with disabilities and those experiencing poverty.
People exercising in Ellis Park in Johannesburg, South Africa. Dino Lloyd/Gallo Images via Getty Images

South Africans must be healthier for universal healthcare to succeed

South Africa faces high levels of noncommunicable diseases such as diabetes and hypertension. The NHI is likely to battle to cope with treating large numbers of sick people.
Protesters in São Paulo declare ‘Black Lives Matter’ at a June 7 protest spurred by both U.S. anti-racist protests and the coronavirus’s heavy toll on black Brazilians. Marcello Zambrana/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians, a legacy of structural racism that dates back to slavery

In Brazil, black COVID-19 patients are dying at higher rates than white patients. Worse housing quality, working conditions and health care help to explain the pandemic's racially disparate toll.
Ladijane Sofia da Concecão, one of millions of unemployed housekeepers in Brazil, accepts a food donation from a friend in São Paulo, May 7, 2020. Alexandre Schneider/Getty Images

In Brazil’s raging pandemic, domestic workers fear for their lives – and their jobs

Maids were among Brazil's earliest COVID-19 victims, infected by employers who had been to Italy. Now 39% of Brazilian 'domésticas' have been let go, most without severance or sick leave.
Walpiri Transient Camp, Katherine: Western medicine can’t be expected to work for disadvantaged Indigenous Australians unless housing and social disadvantage are also addressed.

How a rethink of emergency care is closing the gap, one person at a time

A safe home, a working fridge and access to transport are all needed before western medicine has a chance of working in the long term. But a new way of providing care can help.
Young adults and people living in the inner city are among those most likely to be lonely, according to the ABC’s Australia Talks project. from www.shutterstock.com

Loneliness is a social cancer, every bit as alarming as cancer itself

Loneliness is a bigger cause of death than a poor diet, obesity, alcohol consumption, and lack of exercise, and it's on a par with heavy smoking. So let's get talking about it.
The mother’s education level is also a factor. Brainsil/Shutterstock

These 3 factors predict a child’s chance of obesity in adolescence (and no, it’s not just their weight)

One in four Australians is overweight or obese by the time they reach adolescence, but it's difficult to predict who is at risk. These three questions can help.

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