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Articles on social media propaganda

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Romanian supporters of the QAnon conspiracy theories shout slogans against the government’s measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 infections, like wearing a face mask, during a rally in Bucharest in August. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

Facebook, YouTube moves against QAnon are only a first step in the battle against dangerous conspiracy theories

Facebook and YouTube have brought in measures to stop the spread of dangerous QAnon conspiracies, but members of the Q community have found new ways to promote false theories on social media.
Days before their Oct. 28 presidential election, Brazilians protested news that supporters of right-wing front-runner Jair Bolsonaro had used WhatsApp to spread false information about his opponents. Reuters/Nacho Doce

WhatsApp skewed Brazilian election, showing social media’s danger to democracy

Facebook retired its ‘Move fast and break things’ slogan – perhaps because, as new research from Brazil confirms, democracy is among the things left broken by online misinformation and fake news.
To help with the rebuilding of Syria, we need to curb the rising tide of xenophobia online. Syrian refugees get ready to cross back into war-torn Syria from the eastern Lebanese border town of Arsal, June 28, 2018. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Syrian refugees — the need for an image reboot

One of the World Bank’s mandates is to prepare for the physical and human capital reconstructions of post-conflict Syria. But an image reconstruction of Syrians and of Syrian refugees is also needed

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