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Articles on Terror attacks

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Toxic dust hung in the air around ground zero for more than three months following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Anthony Correia/Getty Images

9/11 survivors’ exposure to toxic dust and the chronic health conditions that followed offer lessons that are still too often unheeded

Those directly exposed to toxic dust and trauma on and after 9/11 carry with them a generation of chronic health conditions, which are placing them at higher risk during the pandemic and as they age.
Domestic extremists were involved in the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. AP Photo/John Minchillo

Why is it so difficult to fight domestic terrorism? 6 experts share their thoughts

Addressing American domestic radicalism will require new ways of thinking about the nation’s problems, and new ways of solving them.
Mourners gather at the scene of the hate-motivated vehicle attack in London, Ont., which left four members of a Muslim family dead and sent their youngest son to hospital. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Geoff Robins

Muslim family killed in terror attack in London, Ontario: Islamophobic violence surfaces once again in Canada

Four members of a Muslim family out for a walk were killed in what police say was a hate crime. A researcher on Islamophobia in Canada says it’s not just fringe groups that hold anti-Muslim views.
New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern wore a headscarf to comfort mourning family members after the Christchurch mosque shootings. AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File

Is there a ‘feminine’ response to terrorism?

After the Christchurch mosque shootings, New Zealand’s prime minister didn’t start a war on terror. She covered her head, cried, paid for funerals and passed gun control. Is it because she’s a woman?
Victims are responding to the Christchurch mosque shooting with bravery and compassion, not anger and hate. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Finding dignity and grace in the aftermath of the Christchurch attack

At a time when we could expect anger, vengeance and resentment to take hold in a community so demolished by violence, Professor Mohamad Abdalla visited victims and found compassion and forgiveness.

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