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Articles on Vaccine hesitancy

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Health care providers are just one trusted source of information for parents on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines for children. Cavan Images/Cavan via Getty Images

COVID-19 vaccines for children: How parents are influenced by misinformation, and how they can counter it

Pediatricians and other health care providers can take some concrete steps toward building trust and counteracting anti-vaccination misinformation.
Through their vaccination choices, parents are often communicating not just what they think, but also who they are. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Unpacking parents’ reasons for not vaccinating their children: why it matters

Vaccination uptake is influenced by many factors and carries a variety of meanings – social, political, economic, ideological, moral as well as biological.
Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers implied he was vaccinated against COVID-19 when he was not, and made statements about the vaccines based on misinformation. (AP Photo/Rick Scuteri) 

The fault in our stars: Aaron Rodgers reminds us why celebrity shouldn’t trump science

NFL star Aaron Rodgers has amplified dangerous and disproven myths about the COVID-19 vaccine. Here’s why his statements are not only untrue, but also harmful because they spread misinformation.
Vaccine hesitancy has been a growing challenge for more than a decade. Concerns about vaccine safety and adverse events are the most commonly cited reasons. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis) 

How cognitive biases and adverse events influence vaccine decisions (maybe even your own)

To help increase trust in vaccines, researchers analyzed data on adverse events to address safety concerns, and then used cognitive science to show how cognitive biases feed vaccine hesitancy.
Carter Giglio, 8, joined by service dog Barney of Hero Dogs, shows off the bandage over his injection site after being vaccinated at Children’s National Hospital in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

I’m an infectious disease doctor. Yes, I’m vaccinating our 5-year-old against COVID-19. Here is why you should too.

An infectious diseases doctor reviews the evidence, discusses hesitancy and concerns about side-effects and explains the overwhelming case for vaccinating five-to-11-year-olds, including his own son.
Ethics are important to vaccination decisions because while science can clarify some of the costs and benefits, it cannot tell us which costs and benefits matter most to us. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Ethical decisions: Weighing risks and benefits of approving COVID-19 vaccination in children ages 5-11

When making the decision whether to vaccinate children aged five to 11 against COVID-19, regulators in Canada must rely on sound ethics as well as sound science.

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