Articles on Weight gain

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Why do women gain weight during menopause?

Hormonal changes that occur during menopause can alter the way fat is deposited in the body, but weight gain associated with menopause is more likely to be a by-product of ageing.
Two new studies have found a link between having antibiotics as a baby and an increased risk of obesity in childhood. From shutterstock.com

The link between antibiotics and obesity in children doesn’t mean you need to avoid antibiotics

New research finds taking antibiotics in early life is associated with an increased risk of obesity at age four. But that's no reason not to give your child antibiotics if they really need them.
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are more likely to be overweight or obese. But it’s easier to maintain a healthy weight while young than wait until later to shift the kilos. Pressmaster/Shutterstock

Weight loss improves polycystic ovary symptoms. But don’t wait until middle age – start now

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome say they find it hard to lose weight. Here's what they can do to improve their symptoms and long-term health.
Regular exercise can go a long way towards keeping off the weight gain at college and you don’t have to be a serious athlete to participate. (Shutterstock)

How to beat the ‘freshman five’ weight gain

Research shows that young adults who don't exercise can expect an average eight kilograms of extra fat on their body by 28 years of age.
Attempts to restructure our “obesogenic” food environment for health are often criticized - as restricting personal choice and freedom. (Shutterstock)

Is the food industry conspiring to make you fat?

Bombarded with unhealthy offerings by the food industry, we blame and shame ourselves for gaining weight. But is it really our fault, or are we being "entrapped?"
The type of sugar in popular soft drinks varies from country to country even if the brand name is the same. from shutterstock.com

We know too much sugar is bad for us, but do different sugars have different health effects?

A recent study found Australian soft drinks had higher concentrations of glucose than US soft drinks, which had more fructose. Does this mean Australian drinks are worse for health than US drinks?

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