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The Sudbury 17 wildfire burns east of Mississagi Provincial Park near Elliot Lake, Ont., in this June 4, 2023 handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Handout, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Canada urgently needs a FEMA-like emergency management agency

Creating a federal agency — let’s call it the Emergency Management Agency of Canada or EMAC — would support comprehensive emergency management as Canada faces more and more natural disasters.
Wearing a protective mask, a dog walker ventures out as heavy smoke from northern Alberta forest fires blankets downtown Calgary on May 16, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Larry MacDougal

Canadian financial institutions are fuelling the climate change crisis

Canadian financial institutions — banks, pension funds and private equity firms — fund the fossil fuel industry and are therefore helping fuel the climate crisis. Why won’t Ottawa hold them to account?
Dairy cows in the Fraser Valley, B.C. (Evan Bowness)

Milk without the cow: Cellular agriculture could be the future of farming, but dairy farmers need help

Technological changes on the horizon will likely disrupt the dairy industry as we know it — plans to mitigate the risks this transition poses to farmer livelihoods and animal welfare should start now.
Vehicles line up during a drive-through COVID-19 vaccine clinic at St. Lawrence College in Kingston, Ont., in early January 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Until we address chronic underfunding, Canada will keep failing at emergency management

Canada’s emergency management system is poorly funded and lacks consistent attention between disasters. This chronic underfunding has undermined public confidence and trust in emergency management.
A woman and children who were stranded by high water due to flooding are rescued by a volunteer operating a boat in Abbotsford, B.C., in November 2021. The Insurance Institute of Canada forecasts that annual insured losses from natural disasters could increase to $5 billion within the next 10 years. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Insurance isn’t enough: Governments need to do better on natural disaster resilience

Although insurance is important in natural disaster recovery, government and property owners also play an important role in protecting Canadians against the impact of catastrophic weather events.
A portion of the Coquihalla Highway near Hope, B.C., is destroyed following heavy rains and mudslides in B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

B.C. floods reveal fragile food supply chains — 4 ways to manage the crisis now and in the future

Food supply chains had already taken a serious hit by panic-purchasing during the COVID-19 pandemic. The B.C. floods remind us how effective supply chain management planning can help avert crises.

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