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Artikel-artikel mengenai British Columbia

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Chronic wasting disease has been detected in two deer samples in British Columbia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Chronic wasting disease has been detected in British Columbia deer, and we need to act now

B.C. has operated a surveillance program for over 20 years to detect chronic wasting disease, a fatal condition with no cure or vaccine. The disease has now been detected in deer in the province.
The 49th Parallel marks the border between the United States and Canada. Global endangered species efforts typically do not take into account cross-border considerations. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Endangered by the 49th Parallel: How political boundaries inhibit effective conservation

Canada is wasting resources, and legitimacy, conserving species that are not endangered elsewhere. Transparent cross-border considerations should inform all new conservation laws.
Stuckless Pond in Gros Morne National Park, N.L. Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas can complement national and provincial parks to promote conservation while also advancing reconciliation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

Canada’s Nature Agreement underscores the need for true reconciliation with Indigenous nations

Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas face significant hurdles but nevertheless remain a key way to advance reconciliation and environmental goals.
Indigenous Coast Salish women wove woolly dogs’ fur into blankets. Artist's reconstruction by Karen Carr

Mutton, an Indigenous woolly dog, died in 1859 − new analysis confirms precolonial lineage of this extinct breed, once kept for their wool

Dogs have lived with Indigenous Americans since before they came to the continent together 10,000 years ago. A new analysis reveals the lineage of one 1800s ‘woolly dog’ from the Pacific Northwest.
Two Canadian Security Intelligence Service surveillance officers pose for a photograph in Vancouver on Oct. 18, 2023. The officer on the right, identified as “Jane Doe” in an anonymized lawsuit, says she was repeatedly raped by a senior CSIS colleague. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

CSIS sexual assault allegations highlight the need for external oversight

The complainants say CSIS’s internal complaint procedure is deficient, leaving people who complain open to reprisals without access to outside assistance.
Tents at an encampment in Crab Park, Vancouver, in August 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

British Columbia’s proposed bill on ‘alternative shelter’ risks doing serious harm to unhoused people

If passed, B.C.’s Bill 45 will trample over the constitutional rights of unhoused people by ignoring shelter barriers, Indigenous rights and the need for daytime shelter
University engagement with communities, such as the clothing exchange organized by UBC Climate Action Mobilizers, is vital for empowering communities and addressing climate injustices. (Linda Nowlan)

Extreme heat, extreme inequality: Addressing climate justice in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

Often those most impacted by climate change are those least able to engage with climate discourse. Universities have a responsibility to engage with these communities.
People gathered outside of the Consulate General of India in Vancouver on June 24, 2023 to protest the recent shooting of Hardeep Singh Nijjar. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ethan Cairns

The fraught history of India and the Khalistan movement

Hardeep Singh Nijjar is one of three high-profile Sikh political activists to be killed in recent months.
Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, walks past Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi as they take part in a wreath-laying ceremony at Raj Ghat, Mahatma Gandhi’s cremation site, during the G20 Summit in New Delhi on Sept. 10, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Justin Trudeau’s India accusation complicates western efforts to rein in China

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s allegations that India was involved in the murder of a Canadian citizen complicates efforts by Canada and its allies to woo India to counter-balance Chinese might.
A tent on the sidewalk in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Cash transfers can help people find suitable accommodations and save governments money. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

We gave $7,500 to people experiencing homelessness — here’s what happened next

Researchers found that most homeless people spent the money they received on rent, food and other living costs.
People march to remember those who died during the drug poisoning crisis on International Overdose Awareness Day, in Vancouver, on Aug. 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Decriminalization: How police drug seizure, even without arrest, can create harms

A police policy of not making arrests for simple possession is a way to essentially decriminalize personal drug use. However, confiscating drugs — even without arrests — can be harmful in many ways.

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