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Artikel-artikel mengenai Dyslexia

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Inquiries into how reading is taught across Canada join efforts in other countries to ensure educators are supporting students’ rights to effective reading instruction. (Shutterstock)

Reading disabilities are a human rights issue — Saskatchewan joins calls to address barriers

A report from the Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission outlines government and school responsibilities for educating students with disabilities and calls for changes in reading instruction.
If teachers were to only address the skills, knowledge and referral protocols that Ontario’s Human Rights Commission recommends, students wouldn’t have essential knowledge to support their reading. (Shutterstock)

Why Ontario’s ‘Right to Read Inquiry’ needs to broaden its recommendations

Direct instruction matters in learning to read, but reading can’t happen unless children are supported in making connections to what they know and their experiences.
The cognitive difficulties that accompany mental health disorders can potentially lead to misdiagnoses and improper treatment. Elva Etienne/Moment via Getty Images

Mental health problems come with an added ‘cost’ of poorer cognitive function – a neuropsychologist explains

While only about 20% of people would qualify for a formal diagnosis of a mental disorder, more than 60% express symptoms of those disorders – and those symptoms can lead to cognitive difficulties.
Lack of access to quality reading instruction and early diagnoses and intervention of reading disorders can have significant, long-lasting effects. (Shutterstock)

Reading struggles? Don’t wait to advocate for your child

Early intervention with reading challenges has very high success rates for supporting reading development, but it is much more difficult to improve reading skills in older students.
Though challenges like dyslexia can make learning difficult, these disabilities shouldn’t define who you are – or what you can do. Tim Kwee

Learning disabilities do not define us

The story of a six-year-old boy with dyslexia who, with support from friends and teachers, became a successful professor. Now he teaches teachers how to help children like him.

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