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Artikel-artikel mengenai Indigenous land rights

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Incoming Australian Greens Senator Senator Lidia Thorpe lifts one fist and carries a message stick, during a swearing-in ceremony at Parliament House, Canberra. AAP/Lukas Coch

What are message sticks? Senator Lidia Thorpe continues a long and powerful diplomatic tradition

Pre-Invasion, message sticks were sent between distant communities to maintain diplomatic relations. They demanded acknowledgement and mutual respect.
There are more than 3,600 territories in Brazil that are home to Quilombola, descendants of escaped slaves, but few hold titles to the land. (Elielson Pereira da Silva)

Indigenous and Afro-Brazilian lands are under greater threat in Brazil during COVID-19

Jair Bolsonaro's government has put forward laws that could put Indigenous land into the hands of mining, agricultural and timber businesses.
Supporters of the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs who oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline set up a support station near Gidimt'en checkpoint near Houston B.C., in January 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Coastal GasLink and Canada’s pension fund colonialism

The fact that so many Canadian pension funds are tied to oil and gas companies is a deeply structural form of racialized oppression and a denial of Indigenous rights.
Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs from left, Rob Alfred, John Ridsdale and Antoinette Austin, take part in a rally in Smithers, B.C., in January 2020 against the Coastal GasLink project. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is a nation-to-nation matter

Reconciliation cannot be achieved by the brute force of the RCMP or the self-interests of energy companies.
B.C. green-lighted an exploration permit to a mining company, despite the fact that plans for a mine were rejected both federally and by the Tsilhqot’in National Government. (Garth Lenz/ Tsilhqot’in National Government)

Tsilhqot’in blockade points to failures of justice impeding reconciliation in Canada

Dasiqox Tribal Park offers a powerful example of what true reconciliation can mean for Canada when Indigenous peoples and their rights are respected and upheld.
Environmentalists and activists with posters “peace in the forest and an end to indigenous genocide” in protest of the rights of indigenous people, in São Paulo, Brazil, January, 2019. PARALAXIS /Shutterstock

Defending the environment now more lethal than soldiering in some war zones – and indigenous peoples are suffering most

Indigenous peoples safeguard biodiversity better than any other group. But in 2018, 164 were killed defending the environment. It's time for us to heed their knowledge, and protect their future.
A steel wall along the U.S. border near Tecate, California, cuts across Mount Cuchame, a site sacred to the Kumeyaay people. Reuters/Adrees Latif

For Native Americans, US-Mexico border is an ‘imaginary line’

The U.S-Mexico border runs through Native American territories. A wall would further divide these communities, separating children from schools, farmers from water and families from each other.
Alexander Joseph from the Babine Lake First Nation joins supporters of the Unist'ot'en camp and Wet'suwet'en First Nation as they gather at a camp fire off a logging road near Houston, B.C., on Jan. 9, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chad Hipolito

Corporations don’t seem to understand Indigenous jurisdiction

TransCanada Corporation has misunderstood or misrepresented the risks associated with Indigenous jurisdiction.
Chief Archie Waquan responds to the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision on whether the government has a duty to consult Indigenous people on legislation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Amber Bracken

Let Indigenous treaties – not the duty to consult – lead us to reconciliation

Rather than the duty to consult, governments should proactively engage with Indigenous treaties or other locally relevant treaties, agreements, laws and relationships at all stages of law-making.

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