Menu

Artikel-artikel mengenai Inequality

Menampilkan 121 - 140 dari 727 artikel

Each of South Africa’s former presidents treated the state broadcaster very differently. From left Jacob Zuma, Nelson Mandela, and Thabo Mbeki (2008). Epa/Kim Ludbrook

Why South Africa needs to fix its troubled public broadcaster

The South African Broadcasting Corporation, like South Africa itself, is a symbol of contradictions. While there are bad people who work for it, there are also many good ones.
Over the past 20 years the number of international branch campuses (IBCs) have grown like “mushrooms in the rain”. Will their entry be beneficial to Indonesians? Shutterstock

Welcoming foreign universities: is it a good deal for Indonesians?

Foreign universities can provide quality education while also opening avenues for global research. However, initiatives must be put in place to make sure they are accessible to all Indonesians.
The statistics show the wealthiest households are getting a growing share of household wealth. The Productivity Commission is trying to tell us they are not. ALAN PORRITT/AAP/ABS

It’s not just the ABS. It’s also the Productivity Commission downplaying the growth in inequality

Freedom of Information documents show the Bureau of Statistics spent a good deal of effort toning down news of rising inequality. The Productivity Commission seems to have been at it too.
Mozambique uses income as a measure of poverty. On this basis, poverty has declined over the past two decades. ANTONIO SILVA/epa

Mozambique case study shows that poverty is about much more than income

Income is a useful measure for tracking economic progress over time. But a broader lens is needed to understand the relational and often political ways in which poverty emerges and is reproduced.
The avocado latte is indeed a thing, but young Australians are spending less on luxuries than they used to, while older Australians are spending more. Shutterstock

For the first time in a long time, we’re setting up a generation to be worse off than the one before it

A new Grattan Institute study finds that for the first time in a long time, young Australians are no better off than those who came before, and are likely to do worse.

Kontributor teratas

Lebih banyak