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Artikel-artikel mengenai South America

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Chileans celebrate victory after the referendum, in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 25, 2020. Felipe Vargas Figueroa/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Chile abolishes its dictatorship-era constitution in groundbreaking vote for a more inclusive democracy

After a year of unrest Chileans voted decisively on Oct. 25 to replace their constitution, a relic of the military dictator Pinochet. Civilians, half of them women, will write the new constitution.
‘Chile Decides’ whether to change its military dictatorship-era constitution at a popular referendum on Oct. 25. Martin Bernetti/AFP via Getty Images

Chile puts its constitution on the ballot after year of civil unrest

On Oct. 25 Chile will decide whether to replace its dictatorship-era constitution with a new one written wholly by the Chilean people. The vote shows how protests can change the course of a nation.
Argentine cartoonist Joaquin Salvador Lavado, who passed away on September 30, also known as “Quino” poses with his comic strip character Mafalda. Alejandro Pagni/AFP

From Mafalda with love: three lessons from the late Quino and his immortal creation

Through his work, the Argentinian cartoonist Joaquin Salvador Lavado Tejon, known to all as Quino, engaged in pointed social critique on a range of topics that are even more relevant today.
Secretary of State Mike Pompeo with Guyana’s president, Mohamed Irfaan Ali, Sept. 18. Pompeo is the first U.S. secretary of state to visit the tiny South American country. AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic crushes Guyana’s dreams of big oil profits as ‘resource curse’ looms over oil-producing nations

Tiny Guyana hoped to see unprecedented wealth this year as ExxonMobil's offshore wells began pumping out crude. Instead, it got a pandemic and political strife. Other oil states are struggling, too.
Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River in hard-hit Manaus state during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Judge orders Brazil to protect Indigenous people from ravages of COVID-19

The Bolsonaro government cannot simply allow Brazil's out-of-control coronavirus pandemic to decimate its Indigenous population, Brazil's Supreme Court says.
Satere-mawe Indigenous men in face masks paddle the Ariau River, in hard-hit Manaus state, during the coronavirus pandemic, May 5, 2020. Ricardo Oliveira /AFP via Getty Images

Brazil’s Bolsonaro has COVID-19 – and so do thousands of Indigenous people who live days from the nearest hospital

Indigenous communities were already suffering badly under Bolsonaro. Now, COVID-19 threatens their very survival.
Protesters in São Paulo declare ‘Black Lives Matter’ at a June 7 protest spurred by both U.S. anti-racist protests and the coronavirus’s heavy toll on black Brazilians. Marcello Zambrana/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

COVID-19 is deadlier for black Brazilians, a legacy of structural racism that dates back to slavery

In Brazil, black COVID-19 patients are dying at higher rates than white patients. Worse housing quality, working conditions and health care help to explain the pandemic's racially disparate toll.
Coffins await burial at the Jardines de Esperanza cemetery in Guayaquil, Ecuador, April 10, 2020. Eduardo Maquilon/Getty Images

Deaths and desperation mount in Ecuador, epicenter of coronavirus pandemic in Latin America

Dead bodies left at home and in streets. Quarantined people facing hunger. Political turmoil. Ecuador's coronavirus outbreak is a grim forecast of what may await poorer countries when COVID-19 hits.
Antonio, from the Yanomami village of Watoriki, photographed in November 1992. After contact with Brazilian society in the 1970s, more than half the Yanomami population died from infectious diseases. William Milliken

Covid-19, isolated indigenous peoples and the history of the Amazon

There are telling parallels between the current pandemic and those that decimated indigenous populations in the post-Columbian era in the Amazon.
He may be praying, but so far the Pope has declined to intervene in Venezuela’s crisis to aid a unified coronavirus response. LUIS ACOSTA/AFP via Getty Images

Catholic Church urges Venezuela to unite against coronavirus

If anyone can convince the Maduro government and the Venezuelan opposition to come together to fight COVID-19, it's the Pope. But the Church's power to negotiate an emergency deal is limited.

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