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Artikel-artikel mengenai US Capitol attack

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Anne Frank House Executive Director Ronald Leopold, left, presents pages of Anne Frank’s diary. Bas Czerwinski/AFP via Getty Images

5 websites to help educate about the horrors of the Holocaust

Information about the Holocaust may be easy to find online, but the best sites offer artifacts and authentic accounts from people who survived the experience, a Holocaust scholar argues.
Fringe groups have long understood that capturing the public’s attention is the best way to spread their views. Karwai Tang/WireImage via Getty Images

Strange costumes of Capitol rioters echo the early days of the Ku Klux Klan - before the white sheets

For many extremist groups, a primary goal is to spread their ideology. Costumes and uniforms – even ridiculous ones – are a form of spectacle that can garner attention and interest.
Rioters clash with police as they try to enter the Capitol building. Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

How history textbooks will deal with the US Capitol attack

The whole world saw the Jan. 6 attack on the US Capitol. How will the textbooks read by America's students describe what took place?
Far-right groups like the Proud Boys, seen here marching in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 12, are increasingly organizing their activities on messaging services like Telegram. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Far-right groups move to messaging apps as tech companies crack down on extremist social media

Encrypted messaging services like Telegram provide virtual dark corners where far-right extremists can recruit, organize and plan unhindered.
Some 25,000 National Guard troops protected Joe Biden’s presidential inauguration due to fears of a far-right extremist attack. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

US could face a simmering, chronic domestic terror problem, warn security experts

Far-right extremists in the US have the potential to mount a coordinated, low-intensity campaign of political violence. It wouldn't be the country's first experience with domestic terror.
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden review the troops from the east steps of the U.S. Capitol during the inauguration on Jan. 20, 2021, in Washington. (David Tulis/Pool Photo via AP)

Biden’s peaceful inauguration doesn’t end America’s longtime coup addiction

From a global perspective, there was nothing unique about the recent raid on the U.S. Capitol. Both Republican and Democratic administrations have backed military coups around the world for decades.
Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts as Jill Biden holds the Bible during the 59th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 20, 2021. (Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP)

Biden presidency marks a return to normalcy after chaotic Trump years

After four tumultuous years under Donald Trump, Joe Biden becomes president and pledges to advocate for unity and healing.
Many of the people who broke into the U.S. Capitol building on Jan. 6 carried cellphones, which can be tracked, and posted photos of their activities on social media. Photo by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

How law enforcement is using technology to track down people who attacked the US Capitol building

Facial recognition, social media and location tracking give law enforcement a leg up in a monumental investigation.
Militia members associated with the Three Percenters movement conducting a military drill in Flovilla, Ga., in 2016, days after Trump’s election. After his 2020 defeat, Three Percenters were involved in the Jan. 6, 2021 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Image

Police, soldiers bring lethal skill to militia campaigns against US government

A leaked database shows at least 10% of the far-right Oath Keepers militia is active police or military – people professionally trained in using weapons and conducting sophisticated operations.
Facial recognition technology raises serious ethical and privacy questions, even as it helps investigators south of the border zero in on the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol. (Pixabay)

As U.S. Capitol investigators use facial recognition, it begs the question: Who owns our faces?

We have unwittingly volunteered our faces in social media posts and photos stored in the cloud. But we've yet to determine who owns the data associated with the contours of our faces.

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