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Arizona State University

Arizona State University (commonly referred to as ASU or Arizona State) is a national space-grant institution and public metropolitan research university located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area of the U.S. state of Arizona. It is the largest public university in the United States by enrollment.

Founded in 1885 as the Tempe Normal School for the Arizona Territory, the school came under control of the Arizona Board of Regents in 1945 and was renamed Arizona State College. A 1958 statewide ballot measure gave the university its present name.

In 1994 ASU was classified as a Research I institute; thus, making Arizona State one of the newest major research universities (public or private) in the nation. Arizona State’s mission is to create a model of the “New American University” whose efficacy is measured “by those it includes and how they succeed, not by those it excludes”.

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Displaying 41 - 60 of 229 articles

Cellular networks have improved rapidly over the last few decades. moodboard via Getty Images

What’s cellular about a cellphone?

A professor of wireless communications explains the origins of cellular networks and how they evolved into today's 5G networks.
The convenience of distance learning at for-profit colleges has contributed to their rising enrollment. damircudic/E+ via Getty Images

Why for-profit college enrollment has increased during COVID-19

For-profit colleges' heavy investment in distance learning has led to a 3% increase in enrollment during the pandemic.
The Supreme Court will soon add another originalist to its ranks if Judge Amy Coney Barrett is confirmed. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

What is originalism? Debunking the myths

The judicial theory has been a major talking point during the past three Supreme Court nominations. But what does it actually mean?
A computer illustration of a cross-section of a mitochondrion and its internal structure with DNA (gray), ribosomes (light green), granules (yellow) and ATP synthase particles (light blue). TUMEGGY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY/Getty Images

Disputes over when life begins may block cutting-edge reproductive technologies like mitochondrial replacement therapies

The nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett has implications for how assisted reproductive technologies, which can prevent the transmission of disease from parents to child, are regulated.
Police officers push back demonstrators next to St. John’s Episcopal Church outside of the White House, June 1, 2020 in Washington D.C. Jose Luis Magana/AFP via Getty Images

From Macedonia to America: Civics lessons from the former Yugoslavia

Demonstrations by Macedonian villagers in the 1980s, which helped spark the end of Communist rule in the former Yugoslavia, hold vital lessons for Americans peacefully protesting for police reform.
Efforts to build wealth for Black Americans could focus on property ownership. Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Community land trusts could help heal segregated cities

Some calls to resolve racial inequities in the US have raised an idea with roots more than a century old: community land trusts to assemble property for the benefit of Black Americans.
Rapid loss of species like these Spix’s macaws, considered extinct in the wild, may represent the sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history. PATRICK PLEUL/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Protecting half of the planet is the best way to fight climate change and biodiversity loss – we’ve mapped the key places to do it

A new plan targets areas around the world that can store carbon and protect large numbers of species. It calls for preserving these lands, working with Indigenous peoples and connecting wild areas.
Community groups, like this one in Phoenix, have been working to get people of color to contribute their information to the census. AP Photo/Terry Tang

Shortened census count will hurt communities of color

The census will likely count fewer Black Americans, Indigenous peoples, Asian Americans and Americans of Hispanic or Latino origin than there actually are.
Soldiers and African American workers standing near caskets and dead bodies covered with cloths during Grant’s Overland Campaign. Matthew Brady/Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division

1864 elections went on during the Civil War – even though Lincoln thought it would be a disaster for himself and the Republican Party

Lincoln's chances of reelection in 1864 were dim. He was presiding over a bloody civil war, and the public was losing confidence in him. But he steadfastly rejected pleas to postpone the election.

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