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Carleton University

Located in the nation’s capital, Carleton University is a dynamic research and teaching institution with a tradition of leading change. Its internationally recognized faculty, staff and researchers provide more than 30,000 full- and part-time students from every province and more than 100 countries around the world with academic opportunities in more than 65 programs of study, including public affairs, journalism, film studies, engineering, high technology, and international studies. Carleton’s creative, interdisciplinary and international approach to research has led to many significant discoveries and creative works in science and technology, business, governance, public policy and the arts. As an innovative institution Carleton is uniquely committed to developing solutions to real-world problems by pushing the boundaries of knowledge and understanding daily.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 189 articles

La façon dont les enseignants se souviennent de leur enfance donne des indices importants sur leur capacité à identifier et à combattre les inégalités dans les écoles aujourd'hui. Shutterstock

Les souvenirs d’enfance des enseignants influent sur leur manière de lutter contre les inégalités scolaires

Lorsque les enseignants utilisent leurs souvenirs pour examiner comment les écoles affectent les chances des enfants sur la base de leur identité sociale, ils imaginent une éducation plus équitable.
How teachers recall their childhoods carries important clues about how likely they are to name and challenge inequities in schools today. (Shutterstock)

How teachers remember their own childhoods affects how they challenge school inequities

When teachers use memories to examine how schools unequally affect children's life choices and chances on the basis of social identity, they're able to imagine more equitable education.
Governments could capitalize on the growth of telecommuting to promote more car-free lifestyles. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

COVID-19 could end our dependence on cars — if we ‘build back better’

The pandemic could be a boon to car use, but it would be a mistake for governments to let that happen. There's a golden opportunity to push towards a zero-carbon transportation system.
Although we would like to think there is a big difference between racialized curiosity and physical violence, there is not. Rather, it is a spectrum of violence that hinges on the very assumptions behind a seemingly innocent question. (Shutterstock)

History of Asian activism tells us to share the burden of responsibility in fighting racism

To remove the burden of responsibility, everyone must take over some of the work that diverse communities have been doing to combat prejudice and fear for decades.
Clayoquot Sound, part of the Tla-o-qui-aht territory, has been the site of numerous protests against logging the forest. Meares Island was declared a Tribal Park in 1984. (Shutterstock)

Respect for Indigenous knowledge must lead nature conservation efforts in Canada

To combat the biodiversity crisis, we need to fundamentally shift our economy and society and make nature conservation the norm.
People take part in a rally against hate and confront the rising violence against Asian Americans at Columbus Park in New York, on March 21, 2021. (AP Photo/Eduardo Munoz Alvarez)

As Asian Canadian scholars, we must #StopAsianHate by fighting all forms of racism

Fifteen Asian academics discuss the roots of anti-Asian racism and limits of multiculturalism in Canada while charting a path forward.
Nike ad in New York in 2018, showing former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick after his 2016 kneeling protest. Could a corporation sell an act like Kaepernick’s ‘kneel’ as an NFT? (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

NFT performance art: Corporations could capitalize on protest

When we see the high prices some are paying for NFT art, we must assume more performances, and potentially, acts of protest, could circulate as NFTs.
Although a product of the current cultural environment, QAnon also reproduces trends and dynamics from the earliest history of Christianity. (Shutterstock)

History repeats itself: From the New Testament to QAnon

A revisionist reading of reality, in which social and political events are only understood by a chosen few, is the basis of the QAnon gospel.
In our current context of rapidly improving technology, archives and museums must constantly make tough decisions about what to keep, what to refuse or even remove. (Shutterstock)

From erasure to recategorizing: What we should do with Dr. Seuss books

Media coverage of the recent Dr. Seuss controversy are rooted in both a lack of awareness of the challenges and realities of maintaining collections and a false understanding of history.
Only parliamentarians and judges cannot be denied access to prisons. It’s time to let people in to determine whether human rights are being violated behind bars. (Unsplash)

COVID-19 pandemic exposes how little we know about prison conditions globally

The COVID-19 pandemic has vividly illustrated how little we know about how prisoners are treated behind bars around the world. The Prison Transparency Project aims to change that.
Avian cholera is a highly contagious disease that has produced rapid population loss in Northern common eiders. (Shutterstock)

How Arctic sea ducks develop herd immunity from avian cholera

We can learn about the spread of diseases through populations by studying naturally occurring instances of herd immunity. Avian cholera in the Canadian Arctic provides a useful case study.

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