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City, University of London

City, University of London is a global University committed to academic excellence, with a focus on business and the professions and an enviable central London location.

The University attracts over 17,000 students (35% at postgraduate level) from more than 150 countries and academic staff from over 50 countries. Its academic range is broadly- based with world leading strengths in business; law; health sciences; engineering; mathematical sciences; informatics; social sciences; and the arts including journalism and music.

The University’s history dates back to 1894, with the foundation of the Northampton Institute on what is now the main part of City’s campus. In 1966, City was granted University status by Royal Charter and the Lord Mayor of London was invited to be Chancellor, a unique arrangement that continues today. Professor Paul Curran has been Vice-Chancellor of City University London since 2010. The University has several other academic sites within central London. Bayes Business School is located in Bunhill Row, the City Law School at Gray’s Inn and the Fight for Sight Optometry Clinic is in Old Street.

It is in the top five per cent of universities in the world according to the Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2012/13 and in the top thirty universities in the UK according to the Times Higher Education Table of Tables 2012. It is ranked in the top 10 in the UK for both graduate-level jobs (The Sunday Times University Guide 2013) and starting salaries (Which University?).

City’s Vision for 2016 is to be a leading global university ranked within the top two per cent of universities in the world. To support the achievement of its Vision, the University is implementing its Strategic Plan including investing up to £200M in research-excellent academic staff, information systems infrastructure and its estate.

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Cognitive bias is alleged to have contributed to the downing of the Iran Air Flight 655 by the US navy, which killed 290 people in July 1988. Bandar Abbas/AFP

Training to reduce cognitive bias may improve decision making after all

It has long been thought one couldn’t bend one’s intuition. Recent research reveals it is in fact possible to reduce bias through training.
Divisions: Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu will find it hard to negotiate a peace deal with support from the extreme right of his cabinet. EPA-EFE/Ronen Zvulun/pool

Benjamin Netanyahu’s biggest problem in negotiating an end to war with Hamas and Hezbollah may be his own government

Facing opposition to a peace deal within his own cabinet, Israel’s prime minister will find it difficult to agree an international peace deal and hold on to power.

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