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Colorado State University

Founded in 1870 as the Colorado Agricultural College, Colorado State University is now among the nation’s leading research universities. Located in Fort Collins, CSU currently enrolls about 22,650 undergraduate students, 4,100 graduate students and 550 Professional Veterinary Medicine students, and has more than 1,800 faculty members working in eight colleges. More information is available at www.colostate.edu.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 265 articles

Many national parks offer lecture series, nature walks and hands-on science projects for the public. fstop123/E+ Collection via Getty Images

4 unexpected places where adults can learn science

Want to observe native bees? Or seek out invasive species? There are many ways to get hands-on science learning. An expert on adult STEM education suggests four places to start.
Some institutions publish information about their mishaps, while others do not. Peter Kneffel/picture alliance via Getty Images

Reporting all biosafety errors could improve labs worldwide – and increase public trust in biological research

A centralized reporting system for laboratory incidents involving dangerous pathogens in biological research does not exist in the US or internationally.
The Earth’s weather and climate interactions form one of the most complex systems imaginable. NASA/Joshua Stevens/Earth Observatory via Flickr

Winners of 2021 Nobel Prize in Physics built mathematics of climate modeling, making predictions of global warming and modern weather forecasting possible

Modern climate and weather models can predict what the weather will be next week and what the climate may be in 100 years. They would not exist without Syukuro Manabe, Klaus Hasselmann and Giorgio Parisi.
In August 2021, comedian Greg Gutfeld’s weeknight talk show ‘Gutfeld!’ became the highest-rated late-night talk show in the U.S. Gary Miller/Getty Images

How conservative comic Greg Gutfeld overtook Stephen Colbert in ratings to become the most popular late-night TV host

Critics have long pooh-poohed conservative comics. But in today’s fragmented media environment, right-wing comedy has become both a moneymaker and a force in politics.
Parts of Lake Elsinore, California, were overrun with muddy floodwater after a storm hit the Holy Fire burn scar in 2018. Jennifer Cappuccio Maher/Digital First Media/Inland Valley Daily Bulletin via Getty Images

Wildfire burn scars can intensify and even create thunderstorms that lead to catastrophic flooding – here’s how it works

An atmospheric scientist and sailplane pilot describes why large areas of burned land can produce clouds and rainstorms.
For centuries, sailors have told tales of milky seas – huge swaths of ocean glowing on dark nights, seen in blue in this false–color satellite image. Steven D. Miller/NOAA

Scientists are using new satellite tech to find glow-in-the-dark milky seas of maritime lore

When conditions are just right in some parts of the Indian Ocean, a type of bacteria will multiply and start to glow. Satellites are helping scientists study these milky seas for the first time.
Studying trends in public adverse event reporting could help researchers address vaccine hesitancy and misinformation. Pict Rider/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Unverified reports of vaccine side effects in VAERS aren’t the smoking guns portrayed by right-wing media outlets – they can offer insight into vaccine hesitancy

Anti-vaccine activists are using the side effect reporting system to spread fear and misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines. But the database could also be used as a gauge for public concerns.
El lago Mead, que abastece a siete estados de Estados Unidos y dos de México, se está secando. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

‘Mega sequía’ en la frontera aviva las disputas entre EU y México por desabasto de agua

Calor sin precedentes y lluvias insuficientes están secando las fuentes de agua compartidas por Estados Unidos y el norte de México.
In high alpine terrain, sun and dry air can turn snow straight into water vapor. Jeffrey Pang/WikimediaCommons

Snow can disappear straight into the atmosphere in hot, dry weather

As rivers run dry in the Rocky Mountains and the West, it’s easy to wonder where all the snow you see on mountain peaks goes. Some of it ends up in the air, but researchers aren’t sure how much.

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