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US President Donald Trump speaks at the 47th March For Life rally on the National Mall, January 24, 2019 in Washington, DC.

Insights into how the US abortion gag rule affects health services in Kenya

The Global Gag Rule transcends abortion and exacerbates weaknesses and vulnerabilities of the Kenyan health system.
A pump jack in the town of Signal Hill, California, which sits within the Long Beach Oil Field near the Port of Long Beach. Frederick J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Living near active oil and gas wells in California tied to low birth weight and smaller babies

A new study finds an association between living near active oil and gas wells in California and low birth-weight infants, adding to findings elsewhere on health risks from oil and gas production.
Lots of positive pregnancy tests this time of year. Kristina Kokhanova/Shutterstock.com

‘Tis the season for conception

Did you ever consider that human beings might have a breeding season? Birth seasonality exists – and has interesting implications for childhood disease outbreaks.
French President Emmanuel Macron has an HIV blood test as part of World AIDS Day observances Dec. 1, 2017. Charles Platiau/Reuters

AIDS treatment has progressed, but without a vaccine, suffering still abounds

World AIDS Day is Dec. 1. With many advances in preventing and treating the disease, the disease has fallen from top of mind for many. An epidemiologist explains why that could be dangerous.
Visitors to Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea at the border of North Korea and South Korea on Jan. 1, 2018. AP Photo/Lee Jin-man

How a nuclear attack on North Korea would add to global cancer epidemic

The Trump administration shelved its plans for a 'bloody nose' attack while the Olympics in South Korea were under way. With the games over, it's time to consider the consequences of a strike.
The Flint, Michigan water crisis highlighted problems with aging infrastructure. Ehrlif/Shutterstock.com

How investing in public health could cure many health care problems

For a country that spends more than US$3 trillion on health care, we are still dealing with many chronic health problems. Funding for clean water, sidewalks and smoking cessation could help.
Kaylee Wedderburn-Pugh, a SPURS student, working to help find answers to Huntington’s disease. Author provided.

How affirmative action could cure cancer and heart disease

Affirmative action programs at universities are under threat by the Trump administration. That could be especially damaging to medical education. Who knows who holds the idea for the next great cure?
Community health workers like these visit patients’ homes in Malawi to help prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. Baylor College of Medicine Children's Foundation–Malawi/Chris Cox

Trump’s global gag order: 5 questions answered

All recent Republican presidents have cut off foreign aid tied to abortion. Trump's expansive version of those restrictions endangers billions slated for HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases.
A director of a supportive housing center in Bronx, New York, talks with a resident and case worker in December 2015. Bebeto Matthews/AP

How funding to house mentally ill, homeless is a financial gain, not drain

About one in three homeless people has a significant mental illness. Providing housing for them has proved to be a boost not only to them and their communities, but also to budgets. Here's why.
Women in rural Malawi, outside an AIDS hospital. AIDS was the first of the ‘new’ pandemic threats, after bird flu. Author provided.

How the Trump budget undercuts security risks posed by pandemics

An active outbreak of a type of bird flu in China raises concerns about worldwide pandemics. Ebola and Zika viruses still threaten. Here's why this is not the time to cut funding.
Family practicing mindfulness together. From www.shutterstock.com

Why there’s more to fixing health care than the health care laws

With changes to health care insurance on hold, now may be a good time to focus not on health insurance but on health. More and more studies show that we do have some control over that. Here's how.
Many low-income girls in the U.S. don’t feel prepared for puberty. Image of girls via www.shutterstock.com.

Low-income girls often feel unprepared for puberty

In developing countries, many girls feel unprepared when they go through puberty. And research indicates that low-income girls in the US may feel the same way.
A woman shows her support for Planned Parenthood at the Women’s March in New York City on Jan. 21.

How Planned Parenthood has helped millions of women, including me

The defunding of Planned Parenthood is a goal of many in the new administration. Here's a look at the facts about the group, including the number of people it serves and the services it provides.

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