Curtin University

Curtin is Western Australia’s largest university, welcoming 58,000 students. In addition to our main campus in Perth, we have campuses in Dubai, Malaysia and Singapore. In 2017, we celebrated “50 Years of Innovation”, recognising the strides we have made in evolving from the Western Australian Institute of Technology (1967–1986) to the sophisticated global university we are today.

Curtin leads a number of major international research projects and is involved with more than 70 research centres and collaborations.

Our growing reputation has seen us rapidly rise up the international rankings in recent years. In 2017, we were ranked among the top one percent of the world’s universities in the Academic Ranking of World Universities.

Links

Displaying 21 - 40 of 566 articles

Charlize Theron in Atomic Blonde. 87Eleven, Closed on Mondays Entertainment, Denver and Delilah Productions.

Beyond Atomic Blonde: cinema’s long, proud history of violent women

From Kill Bill to The Hunger Games, women have been kicking butt in films (and in real life) forever. But we still act surprised when they do, because deep down we still see women as the passive sex.
The evidence so far suggests off-label prescribing for insomnia places users at unnecessary risk of harm. Flavio Ronco/Flickr

Explainer: what is Seroquel and should you take it for insomnia?

Quetiapine, sold under the brand name Seroquel, is a short-acting antipsychotic drug to treat major mental illnesses. It has also been increasingly prescribed off-label for insomnia.
Solar panels are still a rarity in WA’s lower-income areas. Orderinchaos/Wikimedia Commons

WA bathes in sunshine but the poorest households lack solar panels – that needs to change

Western Australia has huge amounts of sunshine and wind, yet only 7% of its energy comes from renewables. What's more, most households in the poorest suburbs are still locked out of the solar panel boom.
Spain plays a relatively inconsequential role in the fight against Islamic State. Reuters/Sergio Perez

Striking in al-Ándalus: why Islamic State attacked Spain

The location and targeting of Islamic State's latest attack, on the Spanish city of Barcelona, deviates from the group's previous efforts.
Around one in seven Australia households either cannot get into housing at market rates or are struggling to pay the rent. shutterstock

Affordable housing shortfall leaves 1.3m households in need and rising – study

One in seven Australian households is in a state of housing need. A shortfall in social housing supply means some are locked out of the market and others pay much more for rent than they can afford.
In the beginning, the Universe expanded very, very fast. Flickr/Jamie

Curious Kids: what started the Big Bang?

What caused the Big Bang is still a mystery. And that's just one of the many unanswered questions, in spite of everything we do know about the birth of the Universe.
Unexpected increases in housing prices could have caused buyers considering home ownership to borrow more in order to buy a house, and encouraged homeowners to spend more through withdrawing the equity from their homes. Dan Peled/AAP

Australians are working longer so they can pay off their mortgage debt

Research finds higher levels of housing debt among pre-retirees are linked to them working for longer.
Children living in the most disadvantaged areas will average half the NAPLAN scores in reading, writing and numeracy tests than those living in the least disadvantaged areas. Shutterstock

New research shows there is still a long way to go in providing equality in education

The gap between the most and least advantaged areas in Australia is reflected in educational inequality.
Heavy alcohol consumption over ten years or more can cause significant brain function problems. But what about casual drinking? Robert Mathews/Unsplash

Research Check: can even moderate drinking cause brain damage?

New research shows an association between moderate drinking and long-term brain impairment. But there are a few reasons to be cautious about these findings.
Generally, people under 40 have reported a decrease in recent illicit drug usage since 2001, while people 40 or older have reported an increase in recent years. AAP Image/Paul Miller

Three charts on: Australia’s changing drug and alcohol habits

The proportion of population who use legal and illegal drugs has remained stable or trended down. Fewer young people are using, but the proportion of older people using drugs and alcohol has grown.

Research and Expert Database

Authors

More Authors