Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 56 articles

A potato farmer works his fields in Prince Edward Island. The time has come for Canada to go beyond growing crops and raising livestock; it’s time to expand its agri-food sector and create its own beloved food products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

As big food brands struggle, Canada has a golden opportunity

Canada does well growing crops and raising livestock, but it's missed the boat in developing its own popular food brands. As preferences change, Canada has a chance to shine in the agri-food sector.
Is meat the new tobacco? Some are suggesting it is, and urging a “sin tax” on beef, pork and other meats. (Shutterstock)

Meat is not the ‘new tobacco,’ and shouldn’t be taxed

Taxing a food product like meat, which has been entrenched in our culture for so long, is silly. We should let the market evolve and allow consumers to make their own choices.
In this recent photo, South Koreans watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s New Year’s speech. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Kim Jong-un is a gangster: Here’s how to sort him out

Chrystia Freeland and Rex Tillerson should remember one point when they meet in Vancouver soon to discuss North Korea: Kim Jong-un runs a feudal gangland, not a nation state.
Rohingya Muslim women who fled Myanmar for Bangladesh stretch their arms out to collect aid distributed by relief agencies in this September 2017 photo. A campaign of killings, rape and arson attacks by security forces and Buddhist-aligned mobs have sent more than 850,000 of the country’s 1.3 million Rohingya fleeing. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)

Unliked: How Facebook is playing a part in the Rohingya genocide

Facebook is unwittingly helping fuel a genocide against the Rohingya people in Myanmar. Does Cuba’s internet model provide lessons to manage social media amid political chaos?
An Amazon worker loads a bag of groceries into a customer’s car trunk at an AmazonFresh Pickup location in Seattle in March 2017. Amazon hopes to offer the service to its Prime customers soon and promises crews will deliver items to cars in as little as 15 minutes after orders are placed. Loblaw is preparing for Amazon to introduce similar services in Canada. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Loblaw on the defensive as the Amazon bogeyman lurks

Loblaw is playing defence against Amazon, the boogeyman of retailing. But if Canadian grocers went on the offensive, they'd be able to deliver much more than food to Canadian homes.
African Americans are being misdiagnosed with the heart condition (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy) that caused the sudden death of basketball player Hank Gathers (pictured left with teammate Bo Kimble) in 1990. Lack of ethnic diversity in genomic databases is a big part of the reason for these misdiagnoses. (AP Photo/Douglas C. Pizac, File)

How the genomics health revolution is failing ethnic minorities

Genome sequencing is transforming the way we diagnose disease. But lack of diversity in genomic data means only some Canadians will benefit from this revolutionary technology.
More carbon stays in the soil when farmers leave their fields alone between harvesting and planting. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman)

How carbon farming can help solve climate change

The Paris climate agreement aims to limit global warming to 2C above pre-industrial levels. We need to curb greenhouse gas emissions, but we can also make gains with carbon farming.
“Grocerant” is a new term that describes what smart grocery stores are becoming – a place for shoppers not only to stock up on essentials, but also to buy high quality prepared meals that can be taken home or eaten on site. (Shutterstock)

The Grocerant: How smart grocery stores are becoming hybrids

The “grocerant” model is going mainstream, and it’s not just because of millennials. A wide swath of consumers from different demographics are demanding the convenience of a grocery store/restaurant.
Pada 2100, lebih dari separuh tanah yang sekarang ditanami kopi akan tak lagi subur. Jeremy Ricketts/Unsplash

Industri kopi hampir dipanggang perubahan iklim

Kopi adalah komoditas yang paling banyak diperdagangkan di dunia setelah minyak. Namun, ketika perubahan iklim mengintai, ada ancaman nyata bagi kisah sukses global kopi.
Over 90 per cent of food and beverage product ads viewed by children and youth online are for unhealthy food products. (Shutterstock)

This is why child obesity rates have soared

New data on soaring child obesity should not come as a surprise. The food industry spends billions marketing unhealthy foods in a global society where over-eating is seen as a character flaw.
A worker handles meat at the Doly-Com abattoir in Romania in 2013 when Europe was facing a scandal over incorrectly declared horsemeat. The problem of food fraud and its health and economic implications affect a broad range of foods around the world, but technology could soon end the problem. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)

How technology will help fight food fraud

Food fraud is a common problem that technologies such as blockchain and DNA fingerprinting can help to solve.
Climate change could severely impact the world’s coffee-producing nations and turn a cup of decent java into a luxury in the years to come. (Shutterstock)

How the coffee industry is about to get roasted by climate change

By 2100, more than 50 per cent of the land now used to grow coffee will no longer be arable. Climate change is changing the game to such an extent that Canada could one day become a coffee producer.
Finance Minister Bill Morneau is not the first Canadian politician to hold the job who’s been confronted with outrage over tax reform proposals. But it’s time to listen to people who get riled up about tax increases. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

Why we should listen to people angry about their taxes

Outrage over tax reform is nothing new. But if we can't be calm about tax, we can at least learn from the stories spoken in anger.
Scientists are using a powerful gene editing technique to understand how human embryos develop. shutterstock

Genome editing of human embryos broadens ethics discussions

A new gene editing experiment explores human development. With this comes new ethical questions: How do scientists acquire embryos and how are their projects approved?

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