Dalhousie University

Founded in 1818, Dalhousie University is Atlantic Canada’s leading research-intensive university, driving the region’s intellectual, social and economic development.

Dalhousie is a truly national and international university, with more than half of our nearly 19,000 students coming from outside of Nova Scotia. Our 6,000 faculty and staff foster a diverse, purpose-driven community, one that spans 13 faculties and conducts over $135 million in research each year.

With 80 per cent of Nova Scotia’s publicly funded research, and as one of Canada’s leading universities for industry collaboration, we’re helping generate the talent, discoveries and innovations that will shape Atlantic Canada’s future.

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Displaying 21 - 40 of 71 articles

Scientists from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration approach a young North Atlantic right whale entangled in fishing gear near Cape Canaveral. (NOAA Photo Library/flickr)

New fishing rules aim to protect Gulf of St. Lawrence right whales

After 17 North Atlantic right whales were killed or caught in fishing gear in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence in 2017, the Canadian government set new rules for the snow crab and lobster fisheries.
Empty grocery stores could be a sign of the future as grocery stores struggle to make profits and consumer preferences for more choice and services, including online shopping, evolve. Clark Young/Unsplash

The increasingly bleak outlook for Canadian grocery stores

Canada's bricks-and-mortar grocery stores are in trouble due to stagnant food prices and changing consumer preferences. More grocery store closures are likely on the horizon.
A hand touches the monument that honours the 26 coal miners who perished in the Westray mine disaster at the Westray Miners Memorial Park in New Glasgow, N.S. On the 26th anniversary of the disaster, are we doing enough to ensure those responsible for such disasters are accountable? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

The importance of accountability after deadly disasters

This week marks the 26th anniversary of the Westray mine disaster in Nova Scotia. There have been plenty of disasters since then but we still struggle to hold people to account when systems fail.
The province of Nova Scotia is leading the way in defining the terms of Canada’s ambiguous law on medically assisted dying. Here Liana Brittain is seen in Halifax in front of a projection of her late husband Paul B. Couvrette, who received a medically assisted death in P.E.I. on Sept. 15, 2017. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan)

Can we die? The seriously ill need clarity

In Nova Scotia, it's clearer now who qualifies for medical assistance in dying. Will the other provinces and territories follow suit?
Filling out tax forms used to be an exercise in legalese torture for Canadian taxpayers. Canada has come a long way, but can still to more to simplify filing taxes. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chris Young

Doing taxes used to be an even bigger pain

In the 1950s, Canada made it easy for employees to file their income tax. Now let's simplify the process for others, too.
A Canadian politician has announced he plans to introduce a private member’s bill to remove the legal prohibitions on payments to surrogate mothers and to sperm and egg donors. (Shutterstock)

Paying surrogates, sperm and egg donors goes against Canadian values

There are sound ethical reasons behind Canada's decision to ban payment to surrogate mothers and sperm and egg donors in 2004. A new push to remove the restrictions ignores the risks.
Normal negative emotions are actually growth promoting and essential for human development and adaptation. They prompt us to address life challenges and opportunities and to develop resilience. (Shutterstock)

Is my child depressed? Being moody isn’t a mental illness

Youth mental illness rates are not rising. We don’t need more pills or therapy. We need to stop pathologizing normal life.
A new report finds concerns about water infrastructure tops the list for Canada’s water providers. (Shutterstock)

Understanding the risks to Canada’s drinking water

World Water Day shines a light on the importance of safe, clean drinking water, but a new report finds Canada's freshwater systems are under stress.
Looks …. tasty? Roasted crickets are shown at the Entomo Farms cricket processing facility in Norwood, Ont., in April 2016. Loblaw has added cricket powder to its lineup of President’s Choice products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Thornhill

Jiminy Cricket! Why bugs may soon be on the menu

Canada's biggest grocery chain is now selling cricket flour under its revered private label. Here's what that says about contemporary eating habits.
Debbie Baptiste, mother of Colten Boushie, is seen here in the House of Commons in February 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

I am a Mi’kmaq lawyer, and I despair over Colten Boushie

Indigenous people are seriously questioning whether Canada is truly changing following the acquittal of the man accused of killing Colten Boushie. A Mi'kmaq lawyer explains the despair.
Younger Canadians are going meatless, but Canada still has a love affair with meat, according to a Dalhousie University study. This 2015 photo shows rib eye steak with gochujang butter and nori. (AP Photo/Matthew Mead)

Young Canadians lead the charge to a meatless Canada

Canadians still love their meat, but consumers under 35 are three times more likely to consider themselves vegetarians or vegans than consumers who are 49 or older.
A welder fabricates a steel structure at an iron works facility in Ottawa on March 5, 2018. U.S.President Donald Trump’s stated intention to impose new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports could start a trade war. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada can’t win a trade war with the United States

Ottawa seems utterly unprepared for a trade war with the United States. The recent federal budget upholding equity values is noble, but won't mean a thing if the government runs out of cash.
Members of a North Korean delegation cheer while holding the unified Korea flag at the pairs figure skating free program at the Pyeonchang Winter Olympics on Feb. 15, 2018 in Gangneung, South Korea. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

North Korean Sport Diplomacy: The Olympic event where everyone loses

The International Olympic Committee has banished dopers from the Winter Games. Shame it hasn't treated North Korea, a noted human rights violator, with the same resolve.
A potato farmer works his fields in Prince Edward Island. The time has come for Canada to go beyond growing crops and raising livestock; it’s time to expand its agri-food sector and create its own beloved food products. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan

As big food brands struggle, Canada has a golden opportunity

Canada does well growing crops and raising livestock, but it's missed the boat in developing its own popular food brands. As preferences change, Canada has a chance to shine in the agri-food sector.
Is meat the new tobacco? Some are suggesting it is, and urging a “sin tax” on beef, pork and other meats. (Shutterstock)

Meat is not the ‘new tobacco,’ and shouldn’t be taxed

Taxing a food product like meat, which has been entrenched in our culture for so long, is silly. We should let the market evolve and allow consumers to make their own choices.
In this recent photo, South Koreans watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s New Year’s speech. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Kim Jong-un is a gangster: Here’s how to sort him out

Chrystia Freeland and Rex Tillerson should remember one point when they meet in Vancouver soon to discuss North Korea: Kim Jong-un runs a feudal gangland, not a nation state.
Rohingya Muslim women who fled Myanmar for Bangladesh stretch their arms out to collect aid distributed by relief agencies in this September 2017 photo. A campaign of killings, rape and arson attacks by security forces and Buddhist-aligned mobs have sent more than 850,000 of the country’s 1.3 million Rohingya fleeing. (AP Photo/Dar Yasin, File)

Unliked: How Facebook is playing a part in the Rohingya genocide

Facebook is unwittingly helping fuel a genocide against the Rohingya people in Myanmar. Does Cuba’s internet model provide lessons to manage social media amid political chaos?

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