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Harvard Kennedy School

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University is a graduate and professional school that brings together students, scholars, and practitioners who combine thought and action to make the world a better place. Our mission is to improve public policy and public leadership across the United States and around the world so that people can lead safer, freer, and more prosperous lives. Harvard Kennedy School teaches current and future leaders the skills they need to effectively advance the public purpose in the public, nonprofit, and private sectors. Our renowned faculty and trailblazing research centers pioneer bold new ideas. And as the most international school at Harvard, we convene global leaders in the Forum, host visiting experts in the classroom, and attract a diverse community of faculty, students, and staff.

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Labeling a Russian rocket attack that killed 12 people in Kramatorsk, Ukraine, as a ‘tragedy’ sidelines human accountabilty. Yan Dobronosov/Global Images Ukraine via Getty Images

Calling the war in Ukraine a ‘tragedy’ shelters its perpetrators from blame and responsibility

Calling something a ‘tragedy’ serves to minimize human responsibility for its causes, which can be convenient for the people who are causing the ‘tragedy.’
The intersection of politics and social media is fertile ground for AI-powered disinformation. AP Photo/John Minchillo

AI disinformation is a threat to elections − learning to spot Russian, Chinese and Iranian meddling in other countries can help the US prepare for 2024

ChatGPT and its ilk give propagandists and intelligence agents a powerful new tool for interfering in politics. The clock is ticking on learning to spot this disinformation before the 2024 election.
Former President Donald Trump greets supporters following a 2020 campaign rally in Arizona. Isaac Brekken/Getty Images

Who likes Donald Trump? Lots of Republicans, but especially Hispanic voters, plus very rural and very conservative people

New findings by political scientists at Northwestern University and Harvard Kennedy School provide a clearer picture of which demographic groups support Trump.
AI chatbots are becoming more powerful, but how do you know if they’re working in your best interest? Carol Yepes/Moment via Getty Images

Can you trust AI? Here’s why you shouldn’t

It’s difficult to see how artificial intelligence systems work, and to see whose interests they work for. Regulation could make AI more trustworthy. Until then, user beware.
AI could help elected representatives raise up constituent voices. AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

AI could shore up democracy – here’s one way

Public comment could soon swamp government officials and representatives, thanks to AI, but AI could also help spot compelling stories from constituents.
Abortion-rights demonstrators protest in front of the Supreme Court building on June 25, 2022, a day after the announcement of the Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization ruling. Brandon Bell/Getty Images News via Getty Images

In the year since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ruled states should decide the legality of abortion, voters at the state level have been doing just that: 4 essential reads

In the year since the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, giving decisions about the legality of abortion back to states, voters and state legislatures have made their preferences on abortion clear.
An AI-driven political campaign could be all things to all people. Eric Smalley, TCUS; Biodiversity Heritage Library/Flickr; Taymaz Valley/Flickr

How AI could take over elections – and undermine democracy

Artificial intelligence looks like a political campaign manager’s dream because it could tune its persuasion efforts to millions of people individually – but it could be a nightmare for democracy.
Speaker Kevin McCarthy said the House would vote on a debt ceiling bill ‘within weeks.’ AP Photo/Seth Wenig

Speaker McCarthy lays out initial cards in debt ceiling debate: 5 essential reads on why it’s a high-stakes game

House Speaker Kevin McCarthy agreed to raise the debt ceiling – and avoid an unprecedented US default – but only if Democrats agree to freeze spending and agree to several other demands.
Supporters of one of several tribal sovereignty bills march in front of the governor’s mansion on April 11, 2022, in Augusta, Maine. AP Photo/David Sharp

Tribes in Maine left out of Native American resurgence by 40-year-old federal law denying their self-determination

After 40 years living under a federal law that denied Maine’s Wabanaki Nations the ability to govern themselves, the tribes have been left out of the prosperity other tribes have attained.
Bill Clinton, at right, oversaw the first balanced budget since 1969, with some help from a bipartisan deal with Newt Gingrich. AP Photo/Doug Mills

I helped balance the federal budget in the 1990s – here’s just how hard it will be for the GOP to achieve that same rare feat

House Speaker McCarthy wants to put the US on a path to a balanced budget as debt ceiling negotiations begin with President Biden. Here’s why it won’t be easy to repeat what Bill Clinton accomplished.

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