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McMaster University

Founded in 1887, McMaster University is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading research-intensive universities. Our researchers are committed to advancing human and societal health and well-being.

Ranked 83rd overall in the 2016 Academic Ranking of World Universities, McMaster is the home of problem-based learning – our signature teaching method. Pioneered at McMaster and adopted by institutions around the world, this innovative approach opens young minds to new ideas and hones the critical thinking skills needed to create healthy communities in a complex and changing world.

At McMaster, collaborative thinking is a gateway to greater intelligence and greater optimism. In short, it’s helping us create a brighter world.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 338 articles

Buildings sit in the water along the shore following Hurricane Fiona in Rose Blanche-Harbour Le Cou, Nfld. Fiona left a trail of destruction across much of Atlantic Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

On the brink: Global crises ranging from climate to economic meltdown demand radical change

Amid a number of major crises, the world clearly needs radical change. But what will it look like? The desire to return to pre-pandemic ‘normal’ is powerful, but ‘normal’ is what got us where we are today.
The blood vessel dilation caused by sildenafil (Viagra) can be beneficial in lung diseases such as pulmonary arterial hypertension or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. (Shutterstock)

Why Viagra may be useful in treating lung diseases

Sildenafil — better known as Viagra — may be helpful in treating lung diseases like pulmonary arterial hypertension and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, for which there are few effective treatments.
Uber deliberately positioned itself as a tech company to avoid the regulations of the taxi industry. (Shutterstock)

The manipulation of Uber’s public image profoundly impacted the lives of taxi drivers

The Uber Files leak reveals that the company embarked on a deliberate public relations strategy that involved the media, public officials and academics.
A limited supply of donor organs, paired with a massive demand for transplants, has fuelled the global organ trafficking industry, which exploits poor, underprivileged and persecuted members of society as a source of organs to be purchased by wealthy transplant tourists. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Killing prisoners for transplants: Forced organ harvesting in China

China’s industrial-scale organ trafficking practice has been executing prisoners of conscience and using their organs for transplantation for decades. This is known as forced organ harvesting.
Former president Donald Trump tosses hats into the crowd before addressing attendees during an event in on July 23, 2022, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)

From Trump to Putin: Why are people attracted to tyrants?

For our societies to survive, we must take action to figure out the psychology behind an attraction to tyrants — or we will be led in the future by fear-mongering, war-mongering tyrannical liars.
A health-care provider administers monkeypox vaccine at an outdoor walk-in clinic in Montréal, on July 23, 2022. It is crucial that people who have been exposed to monkeypox get vaccinated if they do not yet have symptoms, or isolate if they do have symptoms. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Controlling monkeypox: The time for Canada to act is now

To control monkeypox, there is a short window — weeks, not months — in which to vaccinate the most susceptible and to encourage and support self-isolation for those who have symptoms.
Ongoing monitoring of students in early grades will be important to identify how missing out on in-person classes has affected students. (Allison Shelley/The Verbatim Agency for EDUimages)

From full-day learning to 30 minutes daily: The effects of school closures on kindergarteners

The lack of a fully interactive environment in kindergarten due to pandemic school closures may negatively impact some children’s learning in later grades.
Caregivers may neglect their own health because they do not have time or energy to care for themselves. (Pexels/Pavel Danilyuk)

Life after a stroke: Family and friends provide nearly all post-hospital care, but who’s caring for the caregivers?

Family and friends provide nearly all the care needed by stroke patients after they leave hospital. Caregiving can be rewarding, but it can also be overwhelming and take a toll on caregivers’ health.
People rally in support of Ukraine outside the Notre-Dame Basilica in Montréal in April 2022. Scenes like these irritate Russia. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Why Russia demonizes Ukrainian diasporas

The Soviet Union and now Russia has long viewed the Ukrainian diaspora with hostility. Here’s why.
It can be painful for researchers to read harshly worded criticism of their work from peer reviewers. (Shutterstock)

Peer review: Can this critical step in the publication of science research be kinder?

Peer review of research sounds like it should be a conversation between equals. Instead, it can be patronizing, demanding and simply unkind. A group of journal editors thinks this should change.
Patient safety incidents are the third leading cause of death in Canada. (Shutterstock)

When health care goes wrong: It’s time for transparency in patient safety

Patient safety incidents were already a leading cause of death in Canada. With that crisis converging with the demands of the COVID-19 pandemic, health care is being pushed to a breaking point.
A cow waits in a paddock after milking on a farm near Oxford, New Zealand. New Zealand exports 95 per cent of its dairy products, and is challenging Canada’s protection of its dairy market. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)

Why New Zealand is right to call out Canada on its dairy industry

New Zealand is accusing Canada of undercutting its commitments under the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans Pacific Partnership on dairy. Canada’s problem is that New Zealand’s case is strong.
Ontario Federation of Labour rallies in May called for improving workers’ rights and repairing deep inequalities that have been highlighted and deepened by the pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Collectivism — not individualism — is the path to reducing social and economic inequality

In this time of unrest, insecurity and fear, unions and their new, more diverse leadership offer a path to improving workers’ rights and repairing deep social and economic inequalities.

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